How to Replace a Clothesline

Save money and conserve energy by using clothelines.
Save money and conserve energy by using clothelines. (Image: laundry image by samantha grandy from Fotolia.com)

Most people try to spend as little time as possible doing household chores such as the laundry, which is why not all households have a clothesline. But having a clothesline can save you some money, conserve energy and give your laundry a fresh smell. Most clotheslines lasts years, but almost all clotheslines need to be replaced every few years. You can avoid spending money to hire the services of handyman by learning to replace your own clothesline.

Things You'll Need

  • Clotheslines
  • Measuring tape
  • Shovel
  • Cement
  • Level tool
  • Clothesline T-post

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Go around your yard and select a location for your clothesline. Select a spot that runs from north to south and is least visible to the public to give your clothes maximum exposure to the sun and minimal exposure to neighbors and passersby.

Mark the exact spots where you want to place the posts that will hold the clothesline, but do not place the posts too far from each other to avoid too much slack. Dig a hole in the ground approximately 18 inches deep and 12 inches wide on all sides for each post.

Mix a bag of cement with water and fill the hole partially with cement mixture. Get a heavy-duty clothesline T-post, which you can order from websites (see Resources) or buy from your local hardware store, and insert the post vertically into the center of the hole. Use a level to check the vertical and horizontal alignment of the post, and adjust it until it is properly aligned. Pour the rest of the cement into the hole and check the post alignment again.

Erect the second T-post using the same procedure as in Step 3, but make sure that both posts are of the same height. Allow the cement to dry completely.

String the ropes for the clothesline from one T-post to the other, but allow a little slack in the rope.

References

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