How to Craft Your Own Wood Beer Caddy

Ditch the cardboard six-pack and customize your own wood beer caddy to tow your brews in style. This six-pack carrier is complete with a wall-mounted bottle opener so you can enjoy a cold one as soon as you reach your destination.

Wood Beer Caddy (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Things You'll Need

  • ¾ " pine board

  • ¼ " pine lattice

  • Tape measure

  • ¾ " dowel

  • 220 grit sand paper

  • Miter saw

  • Wood glue

  • Brad nailer

  • 1 ¼ " brad nails

  • ¾ " brad nails

  • Wood stain

  • Wall mounted bottle opener

  • ¾ " self tapping screws

  • Nylon string

Cutting and Assembling The Beer Caddy

Step 1

Materials layout. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Using your miter saw, measure and cut the following pieces to length:

A (2) - ¼ " x 2 ½" x 6" B - ¼ " x 2 ½" x 9" C - ¾ " x 9 ½" D (4) - ¼ " x 1 ¼ " x 10 ½" E (2) - ¼ " x 2 ½" x 10 ½" F - ¾ " x 6" x 9" G (2) - ¾ " x 6" x 12"

Step 2

Measuring for angle. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Take your two 12" "G" pieces and mark 7" up from the bottom on both sides and 1 ⅛" from center on each side on top

Step 3

Completing your angle. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Connect your two marks to determine the angle.

Step 4

Making miter cuts. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Match your miter saw to the angle and make your cuts.

Step 5

Notching wood on miter saw. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Notch halfway down on the center of your two "A" pieces and make two notches in your "B" piece halfway at 3" and 6" so they can fit together.

Step 6

Checking the fitment. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Be sure to check your fitment -- this is what will hold your beer in place.

Step 7

Drilling a ¾" hole for the handle. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Using a ¾" Forstner bit, drill a hole 1" down from the top of your two "G" pieces being careful to only drill approximately ½" in and not piercing through the other side.

Step 8

Attaching the side piece. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Apply a thin bead of wood glue to the first 12" "G" piece and attach to "F" (the base) with 1 ¼" brad nails.

Step 9

Attaching opposite side piece. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Apply a small amount of glue and insert your ¾" dowel into the side you just attached.

Step 10

Sides attached with wood glue and nails. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Apply a small amount of glue to the remaining side. Insert the dowel and secure the base with 1 ¼" brad nails.

Step 11

Glueing the divider in place. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Take your notched "A" and "B" pieces and apply glue to the joints and the bottom being careful to align it in your completed base.

Step 12

Attaching the wood slats on the outside. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Take one of your "D" pieces and apply a small amount of glue to both sides and fasten with a ¾" nail on both sides. Repeat on the other side.

Step 13

Measuring equal distance between slats. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Using your tape measure, mark the following "E" and "D" pieces ¾" apart. Glue and fasten with ¾" nails.

Step 14

Removing rough edges. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Sand any rough edges with 220 grit sand paper.

Step 15

Finished assembly. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Assembly is complete!

Finishing Touches

Step 1

Choosing wood finish. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Wipe the wood clean with a damp cloth. Let dry and choose your finish. Minwax Early American was used in this project.

Step 2

Applying stain (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Apply stain evenly, following the directions on the can. Make sure to get inside and cover all the surfaces.

Step 3

Attaching wall-mounted bottle opener. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Using self tapping ¾" screws, attach a wall-mounted bottle opener. I found mine at my local bottle shop.

Step 4

Wrapping nylon handle. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Take your nylon string and begin neatly wrapping the handle. This is optional, but a nice addition.

Step 5

Adding nylon sting to the handle. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Once you reach the end, cut and tie it off.

Step 6

Completed wooden beer caddy. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Pick up some beer from your local bottle shop and enjoy your work.

Step 7

Wooden beer caddy in two finishes. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Now that you've mastered the art of making beer caddies, make one for a friend. Experiment with different finishes -- the one on the left has a charred finish for a rustic look.

Step 8

Beer caddy details. (Image: Photo: Cameron Oden)

Use details that contrast for a striking look.