How to Make a Chair Cover for a Skruvsta

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Sew a slipcover for a Skruvsta.
Sew a slipcover for a Skruvsta. (Image: Sewing machine image by Susanne Karlsson from Fotolia.com)

The Skruvsta chair is made available via Ikea stores. Currently, the chair upholstery is neither removable nor washable. With some sewing experience, new or existing upholstery, a pattern and some time, you can create a washable and removable cover to fit your Skruvsta furniture.

Things You'll Need

  • 2 yards of muslin
  • Scissors
  • Washable fabric marker
  • Straight pins
  • 2 yards of fabric
  • Sewing machine
  • Hand sewing needle
  • Thread
  • Safety pin
  • Drawstring with toggle

Make slipcover pattern

Cut the muslin. Be sure the pieces are large enough to cover the sections of the Skruvsta. Then, drape the muslin pieces over the Skruvsta, and smooth the muslin over the curves.

Use the fabric marker to make dotted lines along the seams. (The seams are the lines where two pieces of upholstery are joined together). Fold the muslin as needed to fit all of the curves smoothly. Pin those folds with straight pins. Keep in mind that you will need to make a "second skin" for the chair. For the bottom of the chair, continue folding the muslin under the chair's bottom to within 6 inches of the chair's post.

Label each piece of muslin. This will allow you to keep track of where each piece belongs. There are two ways to do this. One way to label the pieces is to number them, starting at the left arm and moving around the chair. Another way is to write the position of each piece directly on the muslin, such as "exterior right side back panel."

Remove the pinned pieces of muslin from the Skruvsta. Move them to your work surface. Be careful not to get poked by the straight pins.

Leave the straight pins in the muslin pieces. Then cut along the dotted lines you created in Step 2. Cut out each piece of muslin. Discard the muslin scraps.

Sew cover for Skruvsta

Utilize the muslin pattern pieces to make new upholstery. Begin by laying out your fabric right side up, and pin a section of muslin to it, also right side up. Then, use the fabric marker to make a dotted line 1/2 inch outside the edges of the muslin piece. (The extra 1/2 inch is for the seam allowance, or room to sew the pieces to each other). Place another piece of muslin close to the first, and draw a dotted line around it, leaving 1/2 inch seam allowance. Continue until all of the pieces of muslin have been pinned to the fabric with 1/2 inch seam allowances on all sides.

Cut out the fabric pieces and set aside the remaining fabric. Discard small scraps.

Pick up two pieces that belong next to each other, and place them right sides together. Pinning the pieces together is optional, but if you do use pins, be sure to remove them as you sew to not get in the way of the sewing machine's needle. Sew one line of short stitches down the edge of the fabric to join the two pieces. Open up the fabric and place the next piece on it, right sides together. Sew on that piece with one row of short straight stitches. Continue sewing on pieces until you have added all of them.

Place the first and the last pieces right sides together, and sew one line of short straight stitches down the edge to join them.

Position the cover so that the front pieces are touching the back pieces, right sides together. Line up the pieces and pin them together. Then sew them together like you did the other pieces.

Make a casing for the drawstring or elastic. To do this, hem the bottom edge of the fabric that will go underneath the chair's bottom. Fold over the edge of the fabric by about half an inch, then fold it over again. Next, pin and zigzag stitch along the edge of the folded over hem. Stop stitching when you have a two-inch gap left. This leaves room for inserting the drawstring or elastic.

Tie the drawstring to the safety pin. Push the safety pin through the casing in the chair cover until it comes out the other side. Hand sew the opening closed. Turn the cover right side out and put it on the Skruvsta. Cinch the drawstring tight around the bottom of the chair. Remove and wash as needed.

Tips & Warnings

  • You can use elastic instead of a drawstring if you like.
  • Make a variety of covers and change them when the mood strikes.
  • Be careful to leave enough room for the seam allowance. Cutting off too much fabric can ruin the piece.

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References

  • "The Ultimate Sewing Book"; Maggie Gordon; 2002
  • "The Complete Home Decorator"; Stewart and Sally Walton; 2003
  • "The Complete Guide to Sewing"; Reader's Digest; 1976
  • "Singer Sewing Projects for the Home"; Cy De Cosse, Inc.; 1991
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