How to Make a Quilt Using a Serger

Making a quilt with a serger has some benefits. One of the main benefits is you will be able to complete your quilt in less time than conventional methods of quilt-making require. When you make a quilt with a serger, you are completing the entire quilt, batting and backing layers at the same time, making any finishing steps unnecessary. Learn how to make a quilt using a serger and begin and finish a quilt in a short amount of time.

Things You'll Need

  • 1 yard light cotton fabric
  • 1 yard dark cotton fabric
  • 1.5 yard backing fabric
  • Batting
  • Serger
  • Scissors
  • Sewing machine
  • Cutting mat
  • Rotary cutter
  • Quilting ruler

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Cut the Pieces

Cut 10 3.75-inch wide strips from the dark fabric to the following lengths: 6.75 inches, 9.75 inches, 12.75 inches, 15.75 inches, 18.75 inches, 21.75 inches, 24.75 inches, 27.75 inches, 30.75 inches and 33.75 inches Cut one 3.75 inch square.

Cut nine 3.75-inch wide strips from the light fabric to the following lengths: 6.75 inches, 9.75 inches, 12.75 inches, 15.75 inches, 18.75 inches, 21.75 inches, 24.75 inches, 27.75 inches and 30.75 inches Cut one 3.75-inch square.

Cut 3.75-inch wide strips from the batting and backing the following lengths: One: 33.75-inch strip Two each: 30.75 inches, 27.75 inches, 24.75 inches, 21.75 inches, 18.75 inches, 15.75 inches, 12,75 inches, 9,75 inches, and 6.75 inches Cut two 3.75-inch squares from the batting and backing also.

Cut four 1.75-inch wide strips from the batting, the border fabric and backing fabric. These strips should be at least 35 inches long and will be cut down the exact length needed later.

Cut 2-inch wide strips from the binding fabric that are at least 4 yards long.

Serge the Quilt

Place two 3.75-inch backing squares together with right sides facing each other. Place a 3.75-inch batting square on the backing squares, then a dark 3.75 square (right side facing up), a light 3.75-inch square (wrong side facing up) and another 3.75-inch batting square. Position the fabrics in the serger so that no fabrics will be shaved off while serging. Serge along one edge.

Open out the squares so that the backing is on the bottom and press out the seam with your fingers.

Collect the 6.75-inch rectangles of the fabrics and the batting.

Turn the sewn squares so the dark square is on the top. Place one rectangle of the backing fabric with the right sides facing in under the squares. Place a rectangle of the light fabric with right sides facing in on top of the squares. Place the batting on top of this and serge along the right edge. Open out the fabric and press out the seam with your fingers.

Collect the other 6.75-inch rectangles of the fabrics and the batting.

Turn the sewn squares so that the light rectangle is on the bottom. Place one rectangle of the backing fabric with the right sides facing in under the squares. Place a rectangle of the dark fabric with right sides in on top of the squares. Place the batting on top of this and serge along the right edge. Open out the fabric and press out the seam with your fingers.

Continue sewing the strips in this fashion, adding them in graduating size. Turn the sewn squares one quarter turn clockwise with each new rectangle to be sewn.

Serge on the top and bottom borders in the same fashion with the backing, batting and border fabrics. Cut any excess length of border and backing fabric after you have serged the borders to the quilt.

Serge on the left and right borders in the same fashion with the backing, batting, and border fabrics. Cut any excess length of border and backing fabric after you have serged the borders to the quilt.

Sew on the binding with a conventional sewing machine to finish the quilt.

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