DIY Minimalist Spring Wreath

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Nothing says "welcome" like a cheery spring wreath on your front door, but if your tastes run toward modern decor and you don't like big, froufrou decorations, a minimalist wreath could fit the bill just perfectly for your home decor. Elegant in its simplicity, a minimalist wreath is also easier and quicker to assemble not to mention more affordable. Follow along with this easy DIY wreath tutorial and you'll be stylishly minimalist — to the max.

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Image Credit: Jonathan Fong

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Things You'll Need

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Step 1: Start With a Metal Hoop

A simple, clean metal hoop is the foundation of this wreath. Embroidery hoops can be used, but they are made of two interlocking wood hoops that take away from the minimalism. Metal macrame hoops are also possible to use, but they tend to be on the smaller side. Hoops made especially for floral crafts, which range from about 14 inches to 18 inches, are more appropriately sized for wreaths. They usually come in silver or gold finishes, so there is no need to spray paint them. You can find them at your favorite craft stores or on Amazon.

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Image Credit: Jonathan Fong

Step 2: Gather Your Flowers

For a minimalist vibe, we need to strike a balance so the amount of flowers is neither too skimpy or too full. The sweet spot is to select three different elements: faux greenery plus two types of flowers. For the faux greenery, I used artificial eucalyptus leaves, but ivy or most other leaves work just as well. For flowers, select your favorite dried flowers or silk flowers. I selected artificial lilacs and paired them with ranunculus. Don't be tempted to add any more elements. This wreath needs to stay understated.

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Image Credit: Jonathan Fong

Step 3: Wrap the Greenery Around the Hoop

With wire cutters or metal snips, cut off sections of leaves. Be sure to leave some stem on the leaves, which will be used to attach to the hoop.

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To attach the leaves to the hoop, we'll use floral tape. Floral tape is not sticky at first, but as you stretch it, adhesive is released, and the tape adheres to itself. I like it better than floral wire for this project because the adhesive keeps the elements from spinning around on the wire hoop. I also like it better than using a hot glue gun because it makes it easier to change out the elements if you decide to change them later.

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Image Credit: Jonathan Fong

Wrap each leaf section with floral tape in two locations so it stays in place.

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Secure the leaves so that half of them runs in one direction and the other half runs in the opposite direction.

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Continue until about a third of the hoop is covered with leaves, similar to the shape of a crescent moon.

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Image Credit: Jonathan Fong

Step 4: Add the First Flowers

The shrublike flowers, in this case lilacs, will act as a backdrop for the later flowers. As with the faux greenery, cut the sprigs with a wire cutter or metal snips, leaving about 2 inches of stem.

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Move aside some leaves and secure the stems of the flowers to the hoop wreath with floral tape.

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Continue adding this first layer of flowers until you have three to four bunches on top of the leaves.

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Step 5: Add the Second Layer of Flowers

Cut the flower sprigs with wire cutters or metal snips, leaving about 2 inches of stem.

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Fill in any empty spots between the first layer of flowers with these sprigs, securing them with floral tape.

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A few flower buds are enough to add pops of color and dimension to this wreath. Hang it on a hook or door hanger with some twine or fishing line.

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That's all there is to this minimalist wreath. It's proof that less is definitely more. An added bonus is that because the floral elements are secured with tape rather than a hot glue gun, they can be easily removed and replaced depending on the season or holiday. So, you can go minimalist with a fall wreath or a Christmas wreath.

Image Credit: Jonathan Fong

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