How do I Use Disc Harrows?

Save
(Image: Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Whether you have a large garden spot, a small acreage or a larger farm, disc harrow tillage equipment easily prepares the soil for planting crops. It’s especially important to use disc harrows when the soil is not breaking up well with other tillage methods. The rotary blades of the disc break up clods, while the tines of the harrow follow behind to smooth the soil to make an even seed bed. Disc harrow tillage equipment is simple to operate. Depending on the size, you can cover quite a bit of ground in a short amount of time with one.

Things You'll Need

  • Tractor
  • Hitch pins
  • Grease gun

Video of the Day

Use a tractor that has enough horsepower to pull the disc harrow. The X-shape cut of the disc harrow is more effective at breaking up clods or cutting up old vegetation in a no-till field, but the shape requires more horsepower to pull than a field cultivator that doesn’t cut into the ground at an angle.

Adjust the cutting depth of the disc harrow. Raise or lower the disc harrow from front to back to make it level by adjusting the center link attachment that connects the disc harrow to the tractor. Adjust the disc harrow from side to side by adjusting the lift stops on either side of the disc harrow. Set the lift stops when the disc harrow is level.

Lower the disc harrow into the ground to operate it. Put the tractor in the gear recommended by the owner’s manual of your model. If you drive too fast, the disc harrow leaves a ridge down the center of its path. If you drive too slowly, there is a valley. Raise the disc harrow at the end of the row to make it easier to turn.

Cover the entire field with several passes of the disc harrow. If clods still exist, you can go over the field again traveling in a different direction.

Lubricate the disc harrow when you finish for the day. Use a grease gun to insert grease into the grease zerks. Clean any debris off the disc harrow before you put it away.

References

Promoted By Zergnet

You May Also Like

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!