How to Get Rid of a Bat That Is Trapped Indoors

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A bat would much rather be flying outside than in your house.
A bat would much rather be flying outside than in your house. (Image: David De Lossy/Valueline/Getty Images)

While bats would much rather be outdoors feeding on bugs or resting in their favorite out-of-the-way haunt, they sometimes find their way indoors. Unfortunately, bats and humans don't make good roommates. Bats can carry rabies, a deadly viral disease, that they can transfer to humans through a bite. Even if the errant bat doesn't have rabies, it doesn't practice good hygiene. When it relieves itself, it leaves toxic bat guano -- droppings -- behind.

Things You'll Need

  • Bath towels
  • Leather gloves
  • Wide-mouth food storage container with lid

Trap It

Close all doors to rooms, cabinets and closets. Stuff bath towels underneath the bottom of doors to prevent the bat from crawling under into another indoor area.

Put on a pair of leather gloves to avoid getting bitten. Allow the bat to fly around until it lands.

Approach the bat and cover it with an open wide-mouth container. Slide a heavy piece of paper or large envelope between the mouth of the container and wall and move the container away from the surface while holding the paper securely over the mouth.

Slide the paper out of the way and place the lid onto the container. Make sure the lid is on tight.

Take the container outside, remove the lid and deposit the bat onto a tree. Don't place it on the ground because it will interfere with its ability to fly away.

Provide an Exit

Close all doors to rooms, cabinets and closets. Stuff towels under doors to keep the bat from leaving the room.

Wait until dark. Open doors and windows to the outside so the bat can escape.

Watch carefully to make sure the bat leaves the structure. Close the windows and doors immediately.

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