How to Dry Oregano Leaves

Harvest oregano in the summer and dry it out for use in the winter months.
Harvest oregano in the summer and dry it out for use in the winter months. (Image: Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Oregano is a flavorful herb used in a variety of recipes, particularly recipes for Italian food. Growing oregano in your garden is easy, so it’s likely you’ll have an abundance of the herb after the growing season ends. Don’t toss out leftover oregano. Instead, dry the leaves and save them to use when it's too cold to grow fresh herbs. Oregano will keep its flavor even after it’s been dried.

Things You'll Need

  • Paper towels
  • Knife
  • Cookie sheet
  • Parchment paper
  • Airtight container
  • Heavy-duty string

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Oven Drying

Wash the oregano well under cool water. Dry the sprigs thoroughly with paper towels. Pick off any discolored or wilted leaves.

Preheat the oven to the lowest temperature setting. Pull the leaves off of the hard stems. Chop the oregano into ¼-inch pieces with a knife. Lay the chopped pieces on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.

Put the cookie sheet on the top rack of the oven for two to four hours. Check the leaves periodically since oven temperatures, humidity and climate will vary. When the leaves crumble easily with your fingers, they are done.

Store the dried leaves in an airtight container in a dry, dark spot.

Hang Drying

Wash the oregano well under cool water. Dry the sprigs thoroughly with paper towels. Pick off any discolored or wilted leaves.

Gather about eight sprigs of oregano into a loose bundle. Tie a piece of heavy-duty string around the stems to securely hold them together.

Hang the bundles upside down in a dry, dark place. Leave them there for about two weeks.

Check the oregano bundles every couple of days. When the leaves crumble easily, they are dry.

Take the bundles down lay them on a piece of parchment paper. Use your fingers to crumble the leaves off of the stems. Store the dried leaves in an airtight container in a dry, dark spot.

References

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