How to Make an Aphid Repellent Tea

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Aphids can be a real problem
Aphids can be a real problem (Image: Public Domain)

One of the most devastating things that can happen to your garden is an aphid infestation. Aphids are tiny insects that pierce stems, leaves, and other tender plant parts to suck out plant fluids. Most plants tend to have one or more aphid species which sporadically may feed on them but it is not just the feeding that is damaging. Aphids spread viruses from plant to plant. Most vegetables and fruits are all common hosts of aphid-transmitted viruses. Roses are especially susceptible to aphid attack. Often times the first sign of the virus is a yellowing or curling of leaves and stunting of plant growth. Before the aphids can damage your plants and flowers, give them a nice cup of tea.

Things You'll Need

  • Parsley flakes
  • Clove of Garlic
  • Water
  • Medium sized pot
  • 20 gallon hose-end sprayer

Mark your calendar. Aphids begin to arrive near the end of spring because they are drawn to the new leaf growth.

Dice parsley. About 2 days before brewing the tea, dice up about a cup of parsley. You will only need half a cup but the parsley will shrink as it dries.

Peel a clove of garlic and mince it finely. For best results, use fresh garlic, but the purchased minced garlic in a jar will do if you can't get fresh.

Add the half cup of diced and dried parsley along with 2 tablespoons of minced garlic into a medium pot. Brew the tea by adding 3 cups of water and boil to reduce the mixture down to 2 cups.

Remove the pot from the stove. Allow the tea to cool then add two cups of tea in a 20 gallon hose-end sprayer.

Drench your plants completely from leaves to roots. Repeat the process twice weekly to stop any aphid infestation.

Tips & Warnings

  • Ladybugs are the natural enemies of aphids. If you notice an influx of lady bugs you may have an aphid infestation.
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