How to Build a Fabric Cornice for a Corner Window

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A fabric cornice conceals plain curtain rods or the top of a roller shade or blinds. You can make your own cornice by covering a piece of plywood with the fabric of your choice. To fit in a corner window, make the cornice "L" shaped by attaching to pieces of covered plywood together. A fabric cornice is a great way to get your feet wet in the world of home decorating, as you do not need to sew and the instructions for attaching the fabric are very simple.

Things You'll Need

  • Measuring tape
  • Plywood boards, 12 inches wide, 1 inch thick
  • 2 saw horses or a large table
  • Circular saw
  • Safety glasses and ear plugs
  • Upholstery batting
  • Scissors
  • Upholstery or home decor weight fabric
  • Staple gun and staples
  • 15 L brackets, 1-inch
  • Screwdriver
  • 1-inch screws
  • Measure the sides of the corner window, widthwise. You'll measure from the corner to the outer edge of the window frame on each side. For example, your window may measure 45 inches on each side from the corner to the edge of the window frame.

  • Place a plywood board on the saw horses or table and don your safety goggles and ear protection. Use the circular saw to cut a length of plywood that measures the width of one side of the window, plus 2 inches. Cut another piece of plywood that measures the width of the other side of the window, minus 5 inches. If your window sides both measured 45 inches, cut one 47 inch board and one 40 inch board. You should also cut three boards that measure 6 inches long.

  • Cut the upholstery batting so that it covers the front of the each window board and extends over all four edges (top, bottom and the two 12-inch sides) by a few inches. Cut three more pieces to cover the 6 inch boards. Cut the fabric so that it covers the front of each board and extends over the four edges by few inches. For instance, for a 47 inch by 12 inch board, cut a piece of batting and of fabric that each measure about 53 inches long by 18 inches wide.

  • Place the batting on a flat surface and center the longer board on top of it. Fold the edges of the batting over the back of the board, much like you are gift wrapping the board. The batting won't completely cover the back of the board. Staple in the center one long side of the board, on the backside, then staple in the center on the other long side of the board. Make sure you pull the batting taut. Pull the batting tight and staple in the center on one 12-inch edge of the board. Repeat, stapling on the other side edge. Continue stapling the batting to the board, alternating sides and pulling the batting as tight as you can. Repeat with the shorter board and the three 6-inch boards. You should put a staple about every two or three inches.

  • Cover the boards with the fabric and repeat the stapling process.

  • Place the longer board on a flat surface, fabric side down. Evenly position three L brackets on each 12-inch side of the board. Put one bracket at the top edge of the 12-inch side, one at the bottom edge and one in the middle. You want the part of the bracket that sticks up to be one inch from the edge of the board, so that you can attach 6-inch board to it neatly. The "L" will face the right direction on one side and be backwards on the other side. Place a screw in the holes of each bracket and screw into place. You should have a total of six brackets on the board, three on each side.

  • Press the backside of a 6-inch board against the part of the L brackets that sticks up. Use the screws to attach the brackets to the board. Repeat, attaching another 6-inch board to the brackets on the other side.

  • Screw three L brackets into one 12-inch side of the shorter board. Position the brackets so that the part that sticks up is one inch from the edge of the board. Press the back of the remaining 6-inch board to the brackets that stick up and screw in place.

  • Attach two L brackets to the wall so that the part that sticks up is 1 inch away from the corner on the side of the window where you'll hang the longer cornice. The part that is flat on the wall should point away from the corner. It doesn't matter which side of the corner you choose to hang the longer cornice on. Space the brackets evenly, one 2 inches above the window and another 10 inches above the window. Screw two more L brackets to the wall, with the part that sticks up 1 inch away from the where the edge of the cornice will be on the other side of the window, 2 inches and 10 inches above the window. On the side of the window where you'll hang the shorter cornice, screw two brackets into the wall, 1 inch from the edge and 2 inches and 10 inches above the window.

  • Attach two more L brackets to the side of the shorter cornice board that doesn't have a 6-inch board attached to it. Position the brackets so that the part that sticks up is aligned with the 12-inch edge of the board.

  • Position the larger cornice above the window, so that the brackets attached to the wall are on the inside. The part that sticks up on the brackets should touch the inside of the 6-inch boards. You want the bottom brackets to be 2 inches from the bottom edge of the cornice and the top brackets to be 2 inches from the top edge. You may need someone to hold the cornice up while you attach the brackets to the inside of the cornice with screws.

  • Place the shorter board on the other side of the corner window. Press the brackets on the edge against the outside of the longer cornice. The L brackets on the wall should be against the inside of the 6-inch board. Attach the L brackets on the wall to the 6-inch board, then attach the L brackets on the edge of the board to the longer cornice. You'll have to screw through the fabric and batting, so be patient and have someone help you hold the cornice up.

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References

  • Photo Credit Jupiterimages/BananaStock/Getty Images
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