How to Dry Scallions

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Use dried scallions as you would dried herbs.
Use dried scallions as you would dried herbs. (Image: Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Scallions don't produce a bulb like other onion varieties. Scallions, or green onions, are instead grown for their leafy, green tops. The foliage has a mild onion flavor and is used in both cooked and fresh dishes. Drying allows you to store the scallions for up to six months with a minimal loss of flavor. The dried foliage is used to flavor dips and cooked dishes where the dry texture doesn't compromise the quality of the dish.

Things You'll Need

  • Scallions
  • Knife
  • Pot
  • Bowl
  • Cheesecloth
  • String or rubber band
  • Drying screen

Trim the root end and leaf tips off each scallion. Slice the scallion into 1/4-inch wide pieces.

Bring a pot of water to a full boil. Set a bowl of ice water near the pot.

Wrap the cut scallions in cheesecloth. Gather the edges of the cheesecloth packet together and secure it closed with a string or rubber band.

Dip the scallions into the boiling water for 30 seconds. Remove from the boiling water and plunge the packet into the ice water to stop the cooking process. Shake as much moisture from the packet of scallions as possible.

Open the packet and spread the scallions out in a single layer on a drying screen. Set the screen in a shaded, well-ventilated area to dry.

Stir the scallions on the screen once a day so all sides dry evenly. Scallions take between one and three days to dry completely.

Tips & Warnings

  • Store dried scallions in an airtight container in a dark, dry pantry for up to six months.
  • If you add dried scallions to a dip or a spread, let the scallions sit in the mixture for at least two hours prior to serving.

References

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