How to Fix Metal Storm Windows

Storm windows help to keep the weather at bay.
Storm windows help to keep the weather at bay. (Image: after the storm: raindrops on the window image by Stefan Ataman from Fotolia.com)

Metal storm windows made with aluminum frames are very common on older homes. While the aluminum frames never rust and resist corrosion very well, the moving parts are mostly made from nylon-based plastic that becomes brittle with age and requires replacement. The three main repairs you must make are replacing the spring latches, the top corner pins and cracked glass.

Things You'll Need

  • Screwdriver
  • Drill
  • Drill bit, 3/16-inch
  • Replacement parts
  • Replacement glass

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Removing Storm Window Panes

Remove the pane from the window by pulling in on the springs in the lower corners. If the plastic clips are broken, lever them in with a flat-bladed screwdriver. Push them all the way in, while pulling slightly toward you.

Swing the bottom of the window in toward you once the springs are pressed all the way in.

Move the top of the window down until the corner pegs align with the release slots in the sides of the window frame, about halfway up the window. Pull the corner pegs out through the slots. Reinstall the pane by reversing the removal steps.

Replacing Pins and Spring Clips

Remove the pane from the frame as previously outlined. Check both springs for proper operation. Remove the clips of any spring that doesn't slide in easily and bounce back into place. Press up against the small nylon square protruding through the bottom of the frame to release the clip. Slide it out the end of the spring slide, being careful not to lose the spring.

Replace the small plastic pin from the inside end of the spring. Set the spring over it and slide the new clip into place from the outside end of the spring slide. The small nylon square tab will snap into the hole in the bottom of the frame to hold it in place. Test the spring for proper operation.

Check the top pegs for any cracks or weaknesses. To remove the corner pins, locate the small rectangle indentations about an inch in from the corner, which hold the pin in place. Drill a hole with a 3/16-inch bit through the indentation to release the pressure and slide the pin out.

Slide a new pin in from the corner and tap it firmly until it's flush with the outside edge. Tap the tip of a small, flat-blade screwdriver firmly into the frame to indent it a little closer to the corner than to the hole where the original indent was.

Replacing Cracked Glass

Remove the pane and both top corner pegs, as previously described. Remove the top piece of the frame and pull out gently on the side pieces, being careful not to go out more than needed to remove the broken glass.

Measure the pane from side to side and top to bottom. Purchase new glass 3/8 inch taller and wider than the inside dimensions of the pane's frame.

Pull the broken glass from the frame along with the rubber seal that folds over its edge. Install the rubber seal around the edges of the new pane. Slip the glass with the seal into the groove in the frame, pressing the side pieces back into position and resetting the top piece. Replace the corner pins.

References

  • "Stanley Complete Doors and Windows"; Meredith Books; 2007
  • “Windows and Doors"; Scott McBride; 2002
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