How to Make Fishnet Stockings

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Modern fishnet stockings can be found in most department stores.
Modern fishnet stockings can be found in most department stores. (Image: Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images)

Fishnet stockings were an iconic fashion accessory in the 1960's, but the fashionistas then didn’t invent them by a long shot. They were popular in the 1940's as well. But in the 1960's, they hinted at the risque, the abstract – much like the rest of the decade. These may be harder to find now, except in lingerie catalogs. But with a little investment in time, some yarn and knitting know how, a custom pair can be made. They can be knitted to the right length -- with just the right amount of leg revealed. Lace them up the back and pair them with a sexy outfit for an evening out. What was that Grandma used to say? Keep something long enough and it will be new again?

Things You'll Need

  • For a woman’s medium size:
  • 400 yards of a 98%cotton/2% elastic blend yarn
  • Set of US 4 double pointed needles
  • Set of US 4 straight needles
  • 5 yards of narrow satin ribbon

The Foot

Using the Judi’s Magic Cast On, cast on 16 stitches (eight on each needle) on two double pointed needles.

Round 1: Make one stitch (knit in the front and back of this first stitch), knit 6, make one.
Round 2: Knit.

Repeat these rows until there are 40 total stitches on the needles.

Divide the stitches as follows: Needle one: 10 stitches; Needle two: 20 stitches; Needle three: 10 stitches. Work four more rounds without increasing.

Work the following Pattern 1 until the work measures 4 inches less from heel to toe that the desire length of the sock foot.
Row1: Yarn over, knit two together, repeat to end Row2: Knit. Row3: Yarn over, slip-knit-pass-slipped-stitch-over, repeat to end Row4: Knit.

The Heel

Needle 1: Knit. Needle 2: Work Pattern 1 from above. Needle 3: Knit.

Repeat this round 3 more times.

Work a short row heel, but do not wrap the stitches.

The Leg

Round 1: Needle 1: Knit. Needle 2: Work Pattern 1. Needle 3: Knit. Repeat this round 3 more times.

Change to Pattern 2:
Row1: Knit 2, yarn over, knit two together, repeat from to last 2 stitches, knit2. Row2: Knit. Row3: Knit 2, yarn over, slip-knit-pass-slipped-stitch-over, repeat from to last 2 stitches, knit 2. Row4: Knit.

Change to the straight needles and work back and forth, turning your work at the end of each row. Work Pattern 3 until the work measures one inch less than the length from your heel to your calf muscle.

Pattern 3:
Row1: Slip 1, knit 1, yarn over, knit two together, repeat from * to last 2 stitches, knit 2. Row2: Purl. Row3: Slip 1, knit 1, yarn over, slip-knit-pass-slipped-stitch-over, repeat from * to last 2 stitches, knit 2. Row4: Purl.

Work the Increase Pattern one time:

Row1: Slip 1, make 1, knit 1, yarn over, knit two together, repeat from * to last 2 stitches, knit 1, make 1, knit 1. Row2: Purl. Row3: Slip 1, make 1, yarn over, slip-knit-pass-slipped-stitch-over, repeat from * to last stitch, make 1, knit 1. Row4: Purl.

Return to Pattern 3 and work until the stocking measures two inches below the knee. Now, work two sets of the Increase Pattern.

The Top of the Stocking

Round 1: Slip 1, knit to end. Round 2: Slip 2, purl to end. Round 3: Slip 1, knit 1, yarn over, knit two together, knit 1, purl 1, repeat from * to last 4 stitches, knit two together, yarn over, knit 2. Round 4 and 6: Slip 1, purl 1, purl 1, knit 1, repeat from to last 2 stitches, purl 2. Round 5: Slip 1, knit 1, knit 1, purl 1, repeat from * to last 2 stitches, knit 2.

Round 7 - 10: Repeat round 3 – 6 two more times. Round 11: Slip 1, knit 1, yarn over, knit two together, repeat from * to last 2 stitches, knit 2. Round 12: Purl 1 row even. Round 13: Slip 1, purl 1, knit 1, purl 1, repeat from to end. Round 14: Slip 1, purl 1, knit 1, repeat from * to end. Round 15 – 16: Repeat Rounds 13 and 14.

Bind off. Weave in ends. Wash and block to size. Lace up back leg seam with ribbon.

References

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