How to Remove Oil on the Concrete With TSP

Save
Concrete patio pavers require little maintenance.
Concrete patio pavers require little maintenance. (Image: Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Distinguished for its intense strength and versatility, concrete outperforms and outlasts most masonry. Concrete is used in interior and exterior applications, including countertops, driveways, sidewalks and patios. Since concrete surfaces are porous, they can develop dark oil stains from dripping grills and leaky vehicles. Leaving oil stains on concrete permits them to soak in and ultimately become nearly impossible to extract. Once oil stains have set, a strong degreaser is required to remove them from concrete. Promptly remove oil on concrete using trisodium phosphate.

Things You'll Need

  • Long rubber gloves
  • Safety glasses
  • Wooden stir stick
  • Trisodium phosphate
  • 1/2 cup talc powder
  • 2 containers
  • Trowel
  • Nylon brush
  • Broom

Video of the Day

Protect yourself against the TSP by wearing long rubber gloves and safety glasses.

Prepare a TSP paste to draw out the oil. Stir together 1 cup of warm water, 1 oz. of TSP and 1/2 cup of talc powder in a container.

Disperse the paste over the oil stain using a trowel. Cover the oil-stained concrete completely. Wait for the paste to dry and harden.

Detach the dried paste from the concrete using the trowel. Scrub off stubborn paste fragments using a nylon brush.

Sweep up the loosened paste particles with a broom.

Examine the concrete for dark blotches. If the oil remains, fill another container with 1 gallon of hot water. Stir 1 cup of TSP into the hot water.

Pour the diluted TSP onto the oil-stained concrete. Let the liquid permeate the oil for 20 minutes.

Scour the affected concrete with the brush to dissolve the remaining oil.

Rinse the concrete thoroughly with fresh water.

Tips & Warnings

  • Substitute cat litter or finely ground clay for the talc powder.
  • Never scrub concrete with wire brushes; it can rust cause rust marks.

References

Promoted By Zergnet

You May Also Like

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!