Instructions for Wood Burning Stoves

Wood stoves keep rooms warm with traditional wood-burning heat.
Wood stoves keep rooms warm with traditional wood-burning heat. (Image: Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Wood-burning stoves help keep your home toasty on cold days. They can heat rooms or sections of a house and are made out of a metal that can withstand the heat of a fire. You build the fire inside the inner firebox and heat radiates from the unit and out into the room. Since it is heating from a fire, an exhaust pipe is set up to remove the gases. To operate one of these units you mainly need the knowledge of how to build a good fire.

Things You'll Need

  • Tinder
  • Kindling
  • Wood

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Turn the handle for the dampener, if you have a catalytic combustion stove. This type has a handle other than the door handle that is used to adjust the oxygen flow. This needs to be open when the fire is started and when new wood is added.

Open the door on the front of the stove. This is normally held closed by a handle with a latch. Push down on the handle to lift the latch, then pull open the door.

Place a small pile of tinder in the stove. Put it just below the center of the grate that holds the wood.

Stack kindling over the tinder in a teepee style, leaning the pieces in on each other so that they support each other at a slight angle. This allows air in between the tinder and the kindling, which is essential for the fire to burn hot. Place the kindling under the grate as well, if possible.

Place two or three small logs on top of the grate. These will catch fire after the kindling ignites and raises the fire higher.

Add bigger logs on the pile as the small ones start to burn down.

Tips & Warnings

  • Tinder is something that lights on fire immediately and burns hot for a short amount of time. It is used to help light the kindling. Examples include dryer lint, shredded paper and wood shavings.

References

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