How to Use an Enamel Paint on Wood

Using enamel paint on wood allows the surface to last longer, and is ideal for high-traffic areas like stairways, wooden patios and porches. It also works well on furniture, and creates an easy-to-clean surface for tables and chairs. The thick coverage also makes enamel paint effective on wood, since it covers stains and lower-quality materials. If you want to improve the look of your favorite table or chair, adding a new coat of enamel paint will make it look as good as new.

Things You'll Need

  • Fine-grit sandpaper
  • Undercoat primer
  • Dry cloth
  • Natural-haired paintbrush

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Sand the wood gently with fine-grit sandpaper. This will smooth out any edges or ridges in your piece of furniture. Since glossy enamel paint accentuates everything, it is important to prepare wood thoroughly before painting with enamel.

Paint the furniture with an undercoat primer and a brush. Choose a white undercoat or one that matches your enamel color. Avoid using a darker undercoat than the desired enamel, since it may show through the enamel paint.

Brush the undercoat onto the furniture with a quality, natural-haired brush. Keep the brush strokes along the same direction as the wood grain, and keep strokes even and smooth. Brush strokes should disappear once the undercoat begins to dry. Allow the undercoat to dry for three or four days.

Run fine-grit sandpaper over the surface. Wipe down any dust from the furniture thoroughly with a dry cloth before beginning to paint with the enamel.

Paint the furniture with the enamel paint and a quality paintbrush. Use long, even strokes to apply the paint and avoid putting too much paint onto the brush to keep the coats from getting too thick in some areas. Brush marks will begin to fade once the paint dries. Allow the coat to dry for a week.

Sand the surface with fine-grit sandpaper and wipe off with a dry cloth. Add a second coat of enamel paint, and then allow to dry for a week before using. If you want a heavy-duty application, repeat the process a third time.

References

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