How to Store Homemade Pasta Noodles

Crafting homemade pasta, especially when using a machine designed for the home cook, is surprisingly simple. Once you've gotten the hang of it, you may find that you enjoy it enough to make a surplus amount that you can have at a later date. Fresh pasta will keep in the refrigerator for up to three days or in the freezer for about three months when stored correctly. You can also dry it to a hard consistency and store it in your pantry for about 30 days.

Things You'll Need

  • Clean dish towels
  • All-purpose flour
  • Bowl
  • Ziploc bags

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Arrange a spot for drying the pasta. You may have purchased a special rack for this purpose or will rely on what you have at hand. Hanging a clean dish towel over the backs of chairs, on a small ladder, or on a clothes drying rack all serve the purpose. If you are making thick noodles, like lasagna, these can be laid out on the table. Small stuffed pastas can be dried on a plate.

Lightly dust pasta with flour before hanging. Give the noodles or stuffed pieces a swirl in a bowl of flour so that all pieces are coated. Shake off any excess flour.

Hang the pasta on the racks. Make sure the strands are separated so that they dry individually. This will prevent sticking. Small stuffed pastas, like tortellini, can be placed on a plate or a cookie sheet that has been lightly floured to prevent them from sticking.

Dry for approximately 20 minutes if you just want to refrigerate or freeze the pasta. Large noodles that are drying by laying flat will need to be turned occasionally to dry evenly.

Store fresh pasta in an airtight plastic bag or container. It will stay fresh in the refrigerator for three days or in the freezer for three months.

Dry the noodles for at least 24 hours for pantry storage. The pasta should be brittle and hard to the touch. Storing pasta before it has completely dried can allow mold to grow on the noodles. It should be stored in an airtight container to keep it from becoming stale.

References

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