Rules of the Card Game Euchre

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How to Bid in Euchre....5

In euchre, a player is awarded one point for making three tricks, two points for a euchre and four points for a loner. Discover how the auction process works in euchre with help from the author of five card games books in this free video on the rules of euchre.

Part of the Video Series: How to Play Euchre
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Video Transcript

The rules of the game are pretty basic. I've gone through the scoring system. One point for making three tricks, two points for a Euchre, or two points for taking all five tricks without a loner, and four points for loner and ten points for game. Bidding system, cards are dealt, and now we're going to take this group of cards and we're going to show you a simulated deal real quick. It doesn't necessarily need to be in a particular order and the dealer, some people like to deal two's and three's, I know it's a variation, some people deal one at a time up in Canada, it really doesn't matter, just agree on it, it's not, I was going to say it's not a big deal. That's really bad. After the dealer deals five cards to everybody, the discard pile is put here, and the top card is turned and this is the nine of spades and this where the action starts. The hand is going to rotate around this card. This person picks up their hand and they have a terrific hand. We want to look at these four hands because this is really good instructional stuff. Ok, if we look at all four of these hands, we will see that this person, keep in mind that in every hand there is seven trump, after the thing is named there is seven trump. The odds are that everybody will probably have one trump and there may be one in the kitty, but if we look at the left hand here, with the spade as the trump suit, we will see that he has two spades. Don't forget that's the second in command, that's the left bower. So he has two spades, he has one spades, no spades, and this is a relatively weak hand. Yes, he does have the right, but he doesn't have a very strong hand other than the right. He doesn't have any off suit aces. So what normally would happen here, it's going to go pass, it just doesn't, some people might take a chance with this hand, it's a very borderline hand, depends on the hand and so forth but with only two trump and unguarded left, it's very, very risky. So he's going to pass, he's going to pass, he's going to pass, and even though I like the idea of never turning down the trump when I have the right, I just have a terribly weak hand. So now keep in mind that once I pass, had I chosen to take this trump into my hand I would have done that and I would've gotten rid of another card to bring my hand back to five cards, but I chose to pass because I just don't have the horsepower here although I like the red suits. Now he may opt to go to clubs because he knows that, and you can't name the suit that's been turned down, so he may choose to go to clubs because he has the top two of them and hope to get help from your partner. Another theme we're going to talk about, count on your partner for one trick. If you don't, you're never going to get hands that have three tricks. Aggressive players will call this hand clubs and he has a chance of making it depending on the way that the suits break for him. The point is I just wanted to show you how the trump changes. Once this is turned down, spades cannot be named and there's one more round and if it turns out that it goes pass, pass, pass, now the dealer goes over to here and he's lost his deal. So that's just a quick review on the auction.

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