Where to Find the History of Your Property

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Find out the history of your property by contacting the local county offices where records are kept on previous owners. Contact an insurance agent to discuss any major catastrophes that occurred with a home using advice from a mortgage specialist in this free video on real estate.

Part of the Video Series: Real Estate Financing
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Video Transcript

Hi, my name is Stetson Lowe, and in this clip, we're going to talk about how to find the history of your property. Many times, you buy a home or your parents have lived in a home and you want to know if your property has any historic significance, how many times its been owned, if there's been any major damage caused by storms or man-made, and we don't really know where to turn. But there is an agency and agencies that keep good track of that. One place I would go first would be to your local county offices. The recording agency records all the changes in title and different owners who have owned that, of which you could call and find out more about the property -- about when they lived there. Also, insurance agents have access to a system that keeps track of any insurance claims that have been made on your property for flood or fire, wind damage -- things like that. So that would be a good place to go to your local insurance agent and see if they can pull a property report and find out more about your property that way. The local county should be free and accessible at all times, excluding holidays, in their normal working hours. But you should be able to talk to someone who can help you out for free there and give you a lot of information about the history of your property. Also, your homeowners insurance agent who you do pay for your homeowners insurance should be able to help you out at no cost as well to find out the history of the property. It would be a good idea before purchasing a property to sit down with your insurance agent and make sure there hasn't been any major catastrophic events or damage to the property that would, in some way, you know, hurt the value of the property or make it rendering...kind of render it unsafe and down the road in future times. So I would recommend those two things.

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