Can I Renegotiate My Pay at My New Job?

Business etiquette is one of the most important skills of a professional and it includes all aspects of a job, even asking for a raise. If you ask for a raise too soon, you may be seen as greedy or too entitled, especially when the company just hired you. While you should always be paid fair market value, you must have good reason to renegotiate your salary at a new job.

  1. Identification

    • You can renegotiate your salary at any time, but only proper timing gives you the best chance at a "yes." If you have only been at a job a few months, you have little leverage with the employer. Unless you have made drastic improvements in your productivity and notable accomplishments, there is little reason to raise your pay when the company might still be spending thousands of dollars just to train you.

    When to Ask for a Raise

    • In general, you should only ask for a raise about once a year, suggests the Job Bored. You can also talk about pay during performance appraisals, which might occur every six to 12 months at a large company. There are some exceptions to this practice. A request for a raise might be appropriate when you receive a larger than normal workload or the business is doing much better than in previous months.

    Reputation

    • Reputation means everything in business. If you start off your career by asking for raises frequently you could be known as too eager. You negotiated a starting salary before you were hired, so it would an impasse to go back on that shortly after being hired. It also might hurt your pride when the employer says no.

    Tip

    • You should negotiate an acceptable starting salary before being hired. Research what people are making in the same field with comparable experience and base your request on that. If you are already on the job, wait until the company goes through a period of success and you have a good reason why you deserve a raise. Use numbers when possible, such as beating out other salesmen in your district and never cite personal issues, like wanting to buy a new car.

Related Searches

References

You May Also Like

Related Ads

Featured