How to Fix Fabric Snags

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If you discover a pesky snag in your favorite piece of clothing, you can easily rescue it with just a needle and thread from a basic sewing kit. The method you use depends on the type of fabric you need to repair.

Woven Fabrics

Woven fabrics such as cotton, linen and even satin can be repaired with a few basic sewing supplies.

Things You'll Need

  • Sewing needle
  • Thread that matches the snagged fabric
  • Scissors
  • Steamer, optional

Step 1

Thread the sewing needle with a length of thread that matches the snagged fabric.

Step 2

Stick the needle through the center of the snag, and then secure the end of the thread to the snag with a knot.

Step 3

Insert the needle into the bottom of the snag where it originated, and pull the needle through to the other side of the fabric. This will pull the snag to the wrong side of the fabric while both hiding and securing it.

Step 4

Knot the thread tail to the opposite thread tail to secure it. Then use scissors to trim the ends.

Warning

  • Never cut the snagged thread. This could cause a larger hole that becomes more difficult to repair.

Step 5

If your fabric can tolerate steam, carefully steam the snagged area to further secure the snag and eliminate any puckering.

Tip

  • If the snag is on a formal or special occasion fabric such as an evening gown, it may be best to hire a professional tailor to fix it.

Knit Fabrics

Snags often appear in knit fabrics, including hand knit sweaters. The right method uses the snag thread from the knit fabric to repair it, rather than an extra matching thread.

Things You'll Need

  • Blunt needle
  • Scissors
  • Steamer, optional

Step 1

Thread the blunt needle with the loose, snagged thread of fabric.

Tip

  • If the knit fabric threads are thin and fine, you may substitute a sewing needle for the blunt needle to make it easier to weave in and out of the stitches.

Step 2

If the snag is on the right side of the fabric, insert the blunt needle into the fabric, and pull the snag to the wrong side.

Step 3

Check to see if the snag has caused any of the knitted fabric to gather or pucker. If it has, use your fingers to gently stretch the fabric back into place.

Step 4

With the blunt needle, weave the snag in and out of the fabric closest to the snag to secure it. Weave across, as well as up and down, without straying too far from the snag. Weave in as much of the snag as possible.

Step 5

When you feel that the snag is secure, remove the thread from the needle.

Step 6

If your knit fabric can tolerate steam, carefully steam the snagged area to further secure the snag and eliminate any puckering.

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