How to Cube Pork

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Pork is a popular meat in most cultures, its mild, rich flavor lending itself to most preparation methods and seasonings. Americans often prepare pork as ribs, chops or roasts, all of which use relatively large portions of pork. However, many preparations require the pork to be cubed or diced into smaller pieces. This is a simple task, requiring only a sharp knife and a cutting board.

Things You'll Need

  • 2 lbs. to 3 lbs. boneless pork
  • Sharp knife
  • Cutting board
  • Plate or bowl
  • Place the boneless pork on a clean cutting board. If the pork has been rolled and tied, cut and remove the twine.

  • Trim any surplus fat from the surface of the pork. If the pork was rolled up, unroll it and remove any large seams of fat from the inside. Remove any visible pieces of cartilage or connective tissue.

  • Examine the roast, checking to see how many muscles it contains, and which directions they run. A loin will be a single, uniform muscle, where a shoulder will contain several running in different directions.

  • Cut the roast into strips, following the grain of the meat. In the case of a cut like pork shoulder, separate the larger muscles by cutting along the lines of fat separating them. Cut each muscle separately into strips, where possible.

  • Cut the strips lengthwise again, into the desired width of the finished cubes. For thicker muscles, turn the strips on their sides and cut lengthwise again, to make a square cross-section. Finally, cut across each strip to make cubes. If your cutting board is small, you may wish to remove the finished cubes to a plate or bowl as you work.

Tips & Warnings

  • Lean portions, such as the loin and tenderloin, are the easiest to cut up, but are also the most costly. Pork leg or shoulder is more economical, but requires more time and effort. Shoulder also contains a relatively high proportion of fat, which many cooks will remove.
  • Clean and sanitize any surfaces that have come into contact with uncooked pork.

References

  • "Professional Cooking"; Wayne Gisslen; 2005
  • "On Cooking: A Textbook of Culinary Fundamentals"; Sarah R. Labensky et al.; 2003
  • Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images
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