How to Put a Patch on a Jacket Without Stitches

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Several types of supplies, readily available at crafts and fabric stores, make it easy to put a patch on a jacket, or any other garment, without a needle and thread. Whether you want to cover a hole, prevent wear and tear on a beloved favorite or add a little flair to an otherwise plain jacket, you can do so with a homemade or store-bought patch in a matter of minutes. To make your own patch, simply cut a shape from fabric. Non-fraying fabrics, such as felt, fleece and leather, are ideal.

Things You'll Need

  • Iron
  • Ironing board
  • Patch
  • Fabric marker
  • Scissors
  • Fusible adhesive, fusible web or fabric glue

Fusible Adhesive Method

  • Heat the iron to a temperature suitable for your jacket. Iron the part of the jacket that you want to cover with the patch. Place the patch in position on the jacket and trace around its edges with a fabric marker, or just mark dots at the top, bottom, right and left edges of the patch to indicate its placement.

  • Place the patch down on the paper side a sheet of fusible adhesive and trace around its perimeter with a fabric marker. Cut the shape out using scissors.

  • Place the fusible adhesive shape on the reverse side of the patch, non-paper side down. Press the paper side with the iron, pressing down firmly without wiggling the iron for about 30 seconds. Check to see if the fusible adhesive has firmly fused with the patch. If it hasn't, press it again. When the patch has cooled, peel the paper off the back.

  • Place the patch on the jacket, adhesive side down, in the position you marked earlier.

  • Press the top of the patch firmly with the iron for about 30 seconds. Check to see if the patch has fused firmly to the jacket, especially around the edges. If it hasn't, press again until the patch is securely bonded to the jacket fabric.

Fusible Web Method

  • Iron the jacket and mark the position for the patch in the same manner as the fusible adhesive method.

  • Place the patch on the paper side of a sheet of fusible web and trace around it with a fabric marker. Cut the patch shape out.

  • Peel the paper backing off the fusible web piece to reveal its sticky side. Press the sticky side of the fusible web piece directly onto the reverse side of the fabric patch with your fingers.

  • Position the patch on the jacket, web side down, in the position you marked earlier. Firmly press the top of the patch with an iron for about 30 seconds. Repeat until the patch has firmly adhered to the jacket.

Fabric Glue Method

  • Iron the jacket and mark the position for the patch in the same manner as for the fusible adhesive and fusible web methods.

  • Apply a generous layer of fabric glue over the entire surface of the back of the patch. Make sure the glue reaches the edges of the patch.

  • Immediately place the patch onto the jacket, glue side down, in the position you marked. Press the patch down firmly over its entire surface with your fingers. Be careful not to shift the patch out of place.

  • Leave the jacket undisturbed in a flat position while the glue dries. The fabric glue packaging should indicate an approximate drying time.

Tips & Warnings

  • Look for fusible web, fusible adhesive and fabric glue in the quilting section of a fabric store. Don't confuse fusible web or adhesive with regular fusible interfacing, which is only sticky on one side. Carefully read the description of the product you are considering to make sure both sides of it are fusible.
  • Follow the instructions provided with the fusible adhesive, fusible web or fabric glue.
  • Bear in mind that although fusible adhesive, fusible web and fabric glue are designed to last a long time, the bond will deteriorate over time as you repeatedly wear and wash the jacket.
  • Never let your iron touch the sticky side of fusible adhesive or fusible web -- it will leave a sticky residue on the iron that is difficult to remove, and will ruin the piece of adhesive or web.

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References

  • Photo Credit Ablestock.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images
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