How to Transplant a Kumquat Tree

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The kumquat tree grows to a height of 10 feet. An evergreen, it produces dark-green leaves that measure 3 inches long. White flowers are followed by orange fruit that measures 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Once established, it rarely needs supplemental watering or extensive maintenance. Plant in U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Hardiness Zones 8 to 10. Kumquat trees grow well in containers or when planted directly in the ground. They withstand transplanting well.

Things You'll Need

  • Shovel
  • Mulch (bark chips or recycled plastic mulch)
  • General-purpose citrus fertilizer

Plant the kumquat tree in a location with full sunlight. It can withstand partial shade but fruit production may be lower. The planting location should have well-draining soil.

Dig a hole twice as large as the tree's root ball and approximately 3 feet deep. Mix ample amounts of compost into the soil until it feels crumbly to the touch.

Place the kumquat tree into the hole at the same soil level at which it was planted in its nursery container or previous planting location. Fill in the hole and firm the soil around the tree's root system to remove all air pockets.

Water the kumquat tree well after it's planted. Keep the tree moist until it's fully established.

Apply 3 to 4 inches of mulch around the base of the kumquat tree to help keep weeds under control and keep the soil moist. Keep the mulch at least 12 inches from the tree's trunk.

Fertilize the kumquat tree one month after planting. Use a general purpose citrus fertilizer. Apply it according to the directions on the label.

Pull any weeds that take up residence under the newly planted kumquat tree. Weeds will rob the young tree of valuable nutrients and water.

Tips & Warnings

  • Kumquat trees can be planted at any time of year in temperate regions, but planting during their winter dormancy is ideal.
  • Kumquat trees require no pruning except to maintain the shape or size when desired. Prune the tree from November through April.
  • Pull up or cut away any suckers that grow from the kumquat tree's root system. The suckers will destroy the tree's appearance and sap it of nutrients.

References

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