How to Determine the Pressure of a Water Tank

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Water tanks help maintain and regulate water pressure.
Water tanks help maintain and regulate water pressure. (Image: water pipe image by jeancliclac from Fotolia.com)

Pressurized water tanks are used to store water and regulate water pressure in homes that rely on pumping water from wells. They contain a bladder that alternately fills when the well runs and empties when water is used, which triggers the well to fill it again. The tanks are pressurized with air. As the water bladder drains, pressure falls to the point at which the pump is set to turn on. As the bladder refills, pressure increases to the cut-off point and the pump turns off. Similar water tanks are sometimes used in large buildings to regulate municipal water pressure inside the building.

Things You'll Need

  • Water gauge
  • Tire Gauge
  • Water tank specifications

Purchase a water gauge equipped with a fitting so that it can be attached to a faucet or hose. You can get water gauges of this type at building supply stores for around $10.

Turn off all faucets and other water outlets after you have allowed water to run until the pump turns on.

Attach the water gauge to any faucet. Turn the water on at this outlet only, so the gauge can register the pressure. This will tell you the maximum water pressure at the faucets.

Turn off the pump and open a faucet so that the water tank drains completely in order to check the air pressure in the water tank.

Remove the valve cap from the tank air valve and use a dial type or digital tire gauge to check the air pressure in the tank, just as you would a tire’s pressure. The air pressure is set by the tank manufacturer but may need adjusting from time to time.

Follow tank manufacturer’s specifications for adjusting the air pressure, if necessary.

Replace the valve cap and turn the pump back on when you are finished.

References

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