DIY Cardstock & Yarn Basket Weaving

Baskets are great for storing, organizing or just to dress up an empty area of your home. They can be used as a versatile way to decorate your living space and when you make them yourself, you can choose the size, color and design. Fun for the whole family, this technique is an uncomplicated way to get introduced to the art of basket weaving. Just print off the template, grab a few skeins of yarn and before you know it, you just might have a new favorite hobby.

(Image: Beth Huntington)

Things You'll Need

  • Template

  • Card stock or cardboard cereal box

  • Scissors

  • Paper punch

  • Two colors of yarn

  • Tapestry needle

  • Clothespins

(Image: Beth Huntington)

Step 1

Download the template and trace it onto thick card stock or the back of a cereal box. Cut around the lines and punch a hole in each end. Fold each panel up.

(Image: Beth Huntington)
(Image: Beth Huntington)

Step 2

Start the first color of yarn at the bottom and weave in and out of each panel. Continue to weave and pull the yarn tight until you get about 2/3 of the way up the panels. Cut the yarn, leaving about an inch. Use the tapestry needle to tuck the yarn ends into the woven area.

(Image: Beth Huntington)
(Image: Beth Huntington)
(Image: Beth Huntington)

Step 3

Start the new color and weave it in and out of the panels. Continue weaving until you reach approximately half way up to the holes. Cut the end of the yarn and tuck the ends into the woven area with the tapestry needle.

(Image: Beth Huntington)
(Image: Beth Huntington)

Step 4

Wrap the first color of yarn around the top of the basket at least ten times. Secure in place with clothespins.

(Image: Beth Huntington)
(Image: Beth Huntington)

Step 5

Thread the tapestry needle with contrasting thread. Start at the bottom of the basket and run the needle up through the woven area until the loose end of the yarn is secure. Wrap the white yarn around the gray yarn at top edge, running the needle in and out of each hole. Remove the clothespins as you wrap. Secure the end with a knot and cut.

(Image: Beth Huntington)
(Image: Beth Huntington)
(Image: Beth Huntington)

That a wrap!!

(Image: Beth Huntington)
(Image: Beth Huntington)