How Do Rechargeable Batteries Work?

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Rechargeable batteries are made from different metals than typical batteries, can be charged in less than 15 minutes, and can be used multiple times. Determine how long a rechargeable battery will last on one charge with help from the owner of an electronics store in this free video on batteries.

Part of the Video Series: Electronics Facts
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Video Transcript

OK this is on how do rechargeable batteries work. They are a specialized battery, you cannot use regular alkaline batteries in this charger, they will not charge. These are nickel metal hydride kind of position batteries. These have a 2,500 milliampere hour rating which means if your device uses 2,500 milliamps, it will go, your device will be powered by these batteries for one hour and then obviously if you're device uses 5,000 milliamps, it will only go for half an hour. These batteries will charge in 15 minutes in this specialized charger which is really nice because older batteries took sometimes 8 to 12 hours to charge and this battery charger will also automatically shutoff when these batteries are fully charged. This kit has 4 double A's already preloaded in there so you can take these out and go ahead and put them in your device that requires 4 double A's. These batteries are not charged right now, they come discharged which will give them a much longer shelf life, charge them for your first time for 15 minutes and you're all set to go. This particular kit is great for digital cameras because digital cameras require a high current capacity batteries and because digital cameras use a lot of electricity out of their batteries, if you use standard double A alkaline batteries you can go through a lot of batteries in a short amount of time so this kit can end up paying for itself very quickly. This is also great for small portable televisions or mini CD players or mini DVD players as well.

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