Can You Be Fired for Not Disclosing All Employment on a Resume?

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Everyone wants his resume to be impressive, and that is fine provided that all the impressive information is true. Some people choose to embellish their resume with fake employment or qualifications, or blatantly choose to omit some past employment. Technology has revolutionized the way we live, and intensive background checks make it virtually impossible to get away with lying on a resume or job application.

Previous Termination

  • A main reason for employment omission on a resume is termination. The Columbus Dispatch wrote that an Ohio homeland security official who was hired in 2006 was terminated in 2010 because he had lied about his background on his resume and application. The man intentionally omitted his previous employment at Columbus State Community College, where he was terminated after having an improper consensual sexual affair with a student.

Resumes Vs. Application

  • A resume is an applicant's way of disclosing to a prospective employer what she wants the employer to know. A job application asks a prospective employee what the employer wants to know, which are things like specific dates of employment, salary, reasons for leaving jobs and job contacts. Importantly, an applicant is required to sign the application, verifying that all the information it contains is true. The signed application can be used to protect the employer if it chooses to terminate the workers later if a lie is discovered.

Employer's Rights

  • According to TheLaw.com, whenever an applicant lies on a resume or job application and gets the job, he is more vulnerable when it comes his rights as an employee. It does not matter how long after he is hired and the truth is revealed -- an employer still has a right to terminate immediately. If the employee chooses to sue an employer for violating his rights, the case could be weakened if lies on the resume or application were just discovered.

Considerations

  • Although it sometimes appear much easier to omit an employer from a resume because of a bad experience, it is better to be forthcoming with the truth. According to MarketWatch, approximately 80 percent of U.S. companies are conducting background checks on job applicants, because companies do not want to be sued for negligent hiring.

References

  • Photo Credit NA/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images
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