Job Interview Preparation

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Review key skills that you used on projects before your interview.
Review key skills that you used on projects before your interview. (Image: hands of the businessman image by Alexey Klementiev from Fotolia.com)

You may have to send out dozens of resumes to get one interview, so make sure you prepare for it. First of all, you should study your resume and make sure you can explain what you did in previous jobs. You should also make sure you have the name and title of the person with whom you will be interviewing. Dress appropriately for the interview and arrive about 10 minutes early.

Review Your Skills

Review key skills that you used in previous positions. Match those skills to the job specifications of the open position. For example, if the job requires excellent written and oral communication skills, think about past projects where you used your writing and speaking skills. For example, you may have written marketing research reports, then presented key findings to the management team. Write down all of the skills that are required for the open job. These skills may have been listed in a newspaper ad, or the hiring manager may have sent you the job requirements. Whatever the case, be able to demonstrate how you used each skill in previous jobs.

Research the Company

Knowing about the company in advance demonstrates your interest in working for the company. The interviewer may also ask you to tell him what you know about his company. Therefore, spend an hour or so obtaining some information about the company. Learn when the company was founded, how many people it employs and what products it sells. You can obtain a lot of basic information from the company website. Additionally, read business publications such as "Forbes," "Money" and "The Wall Street Journal" to obtain company information. Go to Bizjournals.com and search for articles about the company, advises Quintcareers.com, an online job reference site.

List of Questions

Prepare a list of questions prior to the interview. Your list of questions should be targeted to your interviewer. For example, you may ask a human resources manager about health benefits and vacation time. Save more project-related questions for the hiring manager. One question to ask is what happened to the person who previously held the position, according to Careerbuilder.com. That person may have been promoted, for example, which may mean the company is expanding. You may also want to ask about the company's training program, especially if you are in sales or management. Prepare a list of five or six questions. Arrange your questions in a logical manner, as your ability to ask questions demonstrates your cognitive skills. For example, ask all project-related questions before moving on to key company strategies.

Rehearsing the Interviewing

Rehearse what you will say during your interview. For example, practice describing tasks you performed in previous jobs. Rehearsing details about your experience will enable you to speak more naturally about it during the interview. You can also ask your spouse or a parent to help you rehearse for your interview. Practice sitting up straight and looking at the person's eyes as you speak. Have your spouse ask you some common interview questions, such as why you want to work for the company or describing key accomplishments.

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