The Average Doctor's Salary in North Carolina

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The North Carolina Labor Market Information Division estimates that the need for medical doctors in the state will increase by 22 to 33 percent from 2006 through 2016, depending on the field of medicine. As with growth rates, the average annual salaries for medical doctors in North Carolina vary based on the field of medicine in which they specialize.

General Practitioners, Surgeons and Internists

As of May 2009, general practitioners and family doctors in North Carolina made an average of $185,050 per year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. At that rate, general practitioners' salaries were nearly 10 percent above the national average of $168,550. Internal medicine specialists received average annual salaries of $208,160 annually, which was 13 percent above the national average of $183,990. The highest paid doctors in the state, North Carolina general surgeons earned an average of $233,560 per year, approximately 6 percent above the national average of $219,770.

Pediatricians and Obstetricians

Pediatricians were the lowest-paid of all physicians in North Carolina as of May 2009. Specialists in pediatric medicine averaged $169,530 per year, approximately 5 percent above the U.S. national average of $220,710. Gynecologists and obstetricians in North Carolina received average annual wages of $220,710. At this rate, specialists in the field averaged nearly 8 percent above the national rate of $204,470.

Other Specialists

As of May 2009, psychiatrists in North Carolina earned an average of $168,190 per year. Average annual wages in the field of psychiatry were about 3 percent above the national average rate of $163,660. Anesthesiologists in North Carolina made an average of $200,830 per year, approximately 5 percent below the national average of $211,750. Across all other medical specialties in North Carolina, doctors received an average of $166,660 per year, which was around 6 percent below the U.S. national average of $173,860.

Licensing and Education in North Carolina

Prior to working as a doctor in North Carolina, prospective physicians must gain licensing through the North Carolina Medical Board. The state requires all would-be doctors to earn a Medical Doctor degree from a medical school accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education. As of January 2011, four colleges in North Carolina had this accreditation: Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University in Greenville and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine. After completing the degree program, physicians must pass a state-approved licensing examination, such as the United States Medical Licensing Examination or the Federation Licensing Examination.

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