How to Rig a Trolling Line Rockfish Striper

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Striped bass are a popular game fish along the East Coast. In some places, they are better known as rockfish. Anglers use many methods to catch striped bass, but one of the most effective ways to catch the larger stripers is to troll with a double rig. Trolling covers more ground with your line in the water than repeated casting, and the double rig presents two lures at variable depths, improving your chances of hooking a keeper.

Things You'll Need

  • Line
  • Leader line
  • Sinker with two eyes
  • Three snap swivels
  • One barrel swivel
  • One three-way swivel
  • Bucktail lure
  • Bucktail spoon

Rigging a Trolling Line for Rockfish

  • Tie the swivel part of a snap swivel to the end of your line. An improved clinch knot is a safe choice when securing line to a lure, hook, or swivel.

  • Attach the sinker to the snap. The weight of the sinker should depend on the depth of the water and the speed at which you will be trolling. Attach another snap swivel to the other end of the sinker.

  • Attach 15 feet of line to the swivel end of the snap swivel by tying an improved clinch knot. Tie one end of a barrel swivel to the end of the line using another improved clinch knot, as shown by the link to Animated Knots by Grog in the resources section below.

  • Tie another 15 feet of line to the barrel swivel using an improved clinch knot. Tie the end of that line to one eye of the three-way swivel with another improved clinch knot.

  • Secure the bucktail spoon by attaching a snap swivel to the top eye of the three-way swivel. Tie 6 six feet of leader line to the snap swivel using an improved clinch knot. Tie the bucktail spoon directly to the leader line with another improved clinch knot. Use a spoon appropriated to the size of the fish that the striped bass are feeding on.

  • Attach the bucktail lure by tying 3 feet of leader line to the remaining eye of the three-way swivel with an improved clinch knot. Tie the bucktail lure to the end of the leader line with an improved clinch knot. The bucktail lure should travel below the spoon in the water.

  • Photo Credit Ablestock.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images
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