How to Fillet Trevally

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From the warm areas of the Atlantic ocean all the way to New Zealand and Australia, the silver trevally is a common and prized recreational fish. The fish has a mild taste that makes it appeal to any palate. However, its flesh is not fatty, so it should only be cooked in a moist environment or seared for a short period of time. Silver trevally is also an appropriate fish for sashimi. Once caught, trevally must be filleted quickly.

Things You'll Need

  • Fresh silver trevally, cavity cleaned
  • Cutting board
  • Sharp fillet knife
  • Rinse the fish thoroughly, including its cavity, under cool running water. Place it on the cutting board.

  • Face the fish toward you, with the head pointed at your torso and the tail pointing away. Insert the blade of the knife behind the gills while holding the head with your other hand.

  • Press the knife downward slowly until it comes into contact with the backbone. Raise it slightly and tilt the blade toward the tail.

  • Run the knife along the backbone, lifting the fillet up with your other hand as you cut. Continue to cut until the fillet is released from the body. Repeat this step with the other side.

  • Insert your knife between the flesh and skin of the first fillet. Run the knife along the point where the skin meets the flesh to remove it. Discard the skin. Repeat this with the other fillet.

  • Find the bloodline that runs along the side of the fish, where the skin was removed. Cut it out using a V cut that only goes halfway down the fillet.

  • Rinse the fillets again under cool water to remove any debris, such as scales, that may be on them.

Tips & Warnings

  • Ensure that your knife is sharp so it makes clean cuts with no jagged edges.
  • Always remove the fat line in the middle, as it can add an unpleasant taste to the fish if it is left in.

References

  • Photo Credit Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images
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