How to Write a Contribution Letter

Save

Many individuals and groups subsist entirely through the generosity of others' contributions. Non-profits, charitable organizations and politicians are just a few examples of the types of organizations and people that get by on contributed funds. If contributing to such an organization, include a short note explaining your reason for your contribution. In doing so, you can contribute not just money, but also valuable information about what that group or person is doing right.

  • Place your name and address on the right side of the letter at the top. If you are writing as a representative of an organization, write the organization's name above your name and the business address of the organization. Otherwise, write your name and personal address.

  • Write the date when you wrote the letter below your address, but on the left side of the page.

  • Write the name and address of the individual or organization to whom you are contributing funds below the date, also on the left side of the letter.

  • Address the individual to whom the letter is being directed with a formal greeting such as "Dear John Smith:". If you are writing to an organization and do not know the name of the individual who will read your letter, write "To Whom It May Concern:" as your greeting.

  • Identify yourself and your reason for writing in the first line. For example, "My name is Susan Stevens and I am writing to contribute $500.00 to the campaign of Senator Steve Ulrich."

  • List your reasons for contributing to the individual or organization addressed in the letter. Though this isn't necessary, it will certainly be appreciated by the person or group. For example, you might write, "Since Food for Kids started in 1992, I have been a fan of its goals and methods."

  • Close your letter with a formal valediction, such as "Sincerely," or "Respecfully," before signing your name. You might also print your name underneath your signature, though that is not necessary, as you identified yourself in the opening line.

References

  • "Technical Communication: A Reader-Centered Approach"; Paul V. Anderson; 2010
  • Photo Credit Cameron Spencer/Getty Images News/Getty Images
Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

You May Also Like

Related Searches

Check It Out

Can You Take Advantage Of Student Loan Forgiveness?

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!