How to Use a Sperry DM 210A Meter

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A multimeter is a precision instrument used to measure AC or DC voltage, the resistance of electrical devices and the amount of current flowing in a circuit. The multimeter is a valuable tool for electricians and anyone working with electricity or electrical components. The Sperry DM 210A is a simple and affordable digital multimeter that is lightweight and easy to carry. The Sperry meter can also test household batteries or show the electrical status of an outlet or appliance. Anyone with a basic knowledge of electricity can use the Sperry DM 210A multimeter.

Things You'll Need

  • Electrical circuit or device
  • Diode
  • Household battery

Measuring Voltage

  • Insert the black test lead into the COM jack and the red test lead into the V-ohm jack.

  • Set the range selector switch on the meter to 600 DCV to measure DC voltage or to 600 ACV for AC voltage. Always start with the highest range of voltage.

  • Touch the black test lead to ground and the red lead to a point on the circuit. The voltage will appear on the LCD of the meter.

  • Turn the range selector switch to the next lower range for a more accurate reading if necessary.

  • Remove the test leads from the circuit under test, then remove the test leads from the meter. Turn the meter off when it is not in use.

Measuring Current

  • Insert the black lead into the COM jack and the red lead into the mA jack.

  • Set the range selector switch on the meter to 200 mA. Always start with the highest range of current.

  • De-energize the circuit that you are measuring. Connect the test probes in series with the device carrying the current. Energize the circuit. The current will appear on the LCD of the meter.

  • If the reading is within the next lower range, completely de-energize the circuit under test before turning the range selector switch to the next lower range.

  • De-energize the circuit before removing the test leads. Turn the meter off when it is not in use.

Measuring Resistance and Diodes

  • Insert the black test lead into the COM jack and the red test lead into the V-Ohm jack.

  • Set the range selector switch on the meter to the Ohm range for the expected resistance.

  • Completely de-energize the circuit or device that you are measuring. Connect the test leads to the circuit or device. The resistance of the device will appear on the LCD of the meter. When measuring a diode, connect the V-Ohm test lead to the anode terminal and the COM test lead to the cathode terminal. The voltage across the diode will appear on the LCD of the meter

  • De-energize the circuit before removing the test leads. Turn the meter off when it is not in use.

Measuring Battery Voltage

  • Insert the black test lead into the COM jack and the red test lead into the V-Ohm jack.

  • Set the range selector switch on the meter to either 1.5 V or 9 V, depending on the battery.

  • Connect the test leads to the terminals (red to positive, black to negative) of the battery. A good 1.5 Vdc battery will read above 80.0 mA. A good 9 Vdc battery will read above 22.0 mA.

  • Remove the test leads from the battery, then remove the test leads from the meter. Turn the meter off when it is not in use.

Tips & Warnings

  • To avoid possible electric shock, meter damage and/or equipment damage, do not attempt to measure voltage above 600 Vdc or if the voltage is unknown. 600 Vdc is the maximum voltage that this meter is designed to measure.
  • The COM terminal potential should not exceed 600V measured to ground. Do not attempt to measure current if the current is unknown or above 200mA. The COM lead potential should not exceed 500 V measured to ground.
  • Measure resistance on de-energized circuits only. To avoid possible electrical shock, meter damage and/or equipment damage do not connect the COM and V-Ohm terminals to circuits having a potential difference exceeding 250 Vdc/ac.

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References

  • Photo Credit Thomas Northcut/Photodisc/Getty Images
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