How to Write a Planning Report

Save
Create a planning report for your next project.
Create a planning report for your next project. (Image: plan #3 image by Adam Borkowski from Fotolia.com)

A new project approaches. It is now up to you to tell all involved how it will unfold in the form of a planning report. A plan is only the beginning, but it should create a backbone for every step of the way. Start with the scope, but consider all factors that will influence the outcome of the project, like analysis, deadlines, milestones and budgeting. Follow the plan, but be aware of hiccups that will inevitably come your way.

Write a Planning Report

First consider the big picture. The scope, or the overall guideline to the project, must be known before you delve in the details. The people involved want to know why the project is being done. Giving them an overall direction will put your planning in perspective when they know how important the project is.

Consider the scope of your project.
Consider the scope of your project. (Image: jeune homme en portrait se posant une question image by arkna from Fotolia.com)

Answer key questions. What events have caused this new project to be planned? How will you, the writer of the report, make the project work? How will you incorporate others to make it work? According to Project KickStart, you should “plan the work and work the plan” to successfully complete a project. In other words, mapping out each step of a plan is required to execute a plan correctly.

Answer key questions as you map your plan.
Answer key questions as you map your plan. (Image: plans and maps on the table image by Wiktor Osiecki from Fotolia.com)

Note what each participant’s role is. Depending on the size of the project, divide people individually or into groups based on the plan’s different aspects. This creates “accountability for anyone wishing at any time to assess how the project is going,” according to businessballs.com.

Determine the role of each person or group involved and what their tasks are.
Determine the role of each person or group involved and what their tasks are. (Image: teacher & students image by Luisafer from Fotolia.com)

Set mini-deadlines, and milestones to supplement these time crunches, for each project aspect. The accumulation of small goals makes the scope much easier to grasp.

Set mini-deadlines along the way.
Set mini-deadlines along the way. (Image: clock grey image by Nicemonkey from Fotolia.com)

Note what resources will be used, and if applicable, identify what extra funds will be used to carry out the project. In other words, summarize a budget. “Putting estimated numbers to the component parts is the most crucial part of budget building,” according to Smead Organomics. Smead recommends this be done by analyzing historical records from similar projects and previous budgets, and by obtaining pricing from suppliers.

Know how much the plan will cost and what resources will be used.
Know how much the plan will cost and what resources will be used. (Image: money makes money image by Andrey Andreev from Fotolia.com)

Later, set a time to review the plan. After the project is done identify strengths, weaknesses and changes to the plan as the project took place. What could be done to improve upon a similar plan later? If you like, create a small survey for everyone involved.

Conduct a survey, at the end of your report, for all who were involved.
Conduct a survey, at the end of your report, for all who were involved. (Image: performance review image by Christopher Hall from Fotolia.com)

Related Searches

Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

You May Also Like

Related Searches

Check It Out

Are You Really Getting A Deal From Discount Stores?

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!