How to Get Rid of Junk TVs

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Recycling an old TV is easier than ever thanks to local, state, and federal organizations that help recycle electronic products. Aside from local or regional recycling facilities, some electronics manufacturers may offer to recycle a junk TV, often free of charge. Recycling an old TV instead of dumping it in the garbage helps to keep the environment clean and free of the hazardous chemicals and materials found in many electronics. Alternatives to recycling a TV include repairing it and donating it to a charitable organization or other needy cause.

Ways to Recycle a Junk TV

  • Purchase a new television set and have it delivered. Most companies offer to carry away and recycle or refurbish an old TV free of charge. Check with the company prior to delivery and arrange for the old TV to be picked up.

  • Avoid throwing away a junk TV in a landfill or garbage incinerator, because some TVs may contain harmful materials such as lead. Burning and disposing of TVs improperly increases the risk of water and air pollution due to hazardous chemicals. Take the TV to the nearest electronics recycling facility, even if it is not local, to show support for both safety and the environment.

  • Consider donating an old TV to charity if it still works properly or can be repaired at little cost. Some local or regional charities may have a need for used electronics and will pass them along to share with other charities in need. Call charitable organizations in your area to determine if they accept donations of used electronic.

  • Repair the old TV and put it in another room in the home if the TV cannot be recycled or donated. Most televisions can be fixed relatively inexpensively when compared to the cost of a new unit.

Tips & Warnings

  • Recycling electronics such as junk TVs can benefit the needy--many can be refurbished and given to charities for reuse. Others may be fully recycled for the recovery of materials like plastics, metals, and glass.
  • Keeping old electronics out of landfills helps keep dangerous materials such as lead and mercury out of the ecosystem. It also helps to conserve resources.

References

  • Photo Credit Agri Press/Lifesize/Getty Images
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