How to Play the Card Game Bridge

Save

Bridge is a popular card game for four players working as partners who sit across the table from each other. It is played with a standard deck of 52 cards and the cards are ranked normally, with aces high and deuces low. Some hands use a particular suit as trump, meaning that suit becomes the most powerful in a hand, while others do not. This is determined by the player offering the highest bid.

  • Deal cards around the table, one at a time, until everyone has 13 cards. Start by dealing to the player to your left and proceed clockwise.

  • Bid or pass when it is your turn. Your bid must be higher than the previous high bid and based on the number of tricks you think your hand can win. In bridge, six tricks is assumed, since that number of tricks is just below the halfway mark (13) of total tricks. So, when you bid, you are bidding the number of tricks you think you can take above six. You also either bid a suit you wish to call trump or bid no-trump.

    For example, a bid of two hearts means you think you can take eight tricks using hearts as trump (six assumed tricks, plus two more). A bid of one no-trump means you think you can take seven tricks (six plus one) without using trumps.

    Suits rank with spades highest, followed by hearts, diamonds and clubs. This comes into play if two players bid the same number of tricks.

    A no-trump bid is higher than any trump bid of the same number of tricks.

  • Play the first hand in clockwise order, starting with the player to the left of the bid winner. He may play any card.

  • Turn over the hand of your partner, whose turn is next. This is now a dummy hand for all to see. Choose a card from this hand to play next. As with all hands, you must throw a card that follows suit when you can. If you can't, you may play any card. Win the trick if you or the card you played from the dummy hand is the highest. If there are trump cards, these beat all other cards. The highest trump thrown in a trick wins the trick.

  • Continue to play until all tricks have been taken.

  • Count your score if you made the number of tricks you bid. If the trump was clubs or diamonds, count 20 points for each trick you took. If trump was hearts or spades, count 30 for each trick. If you bid no-trump, count 40 points for one trick and 30 for all others.

  • Count your opponents' points if you did not make your bid. They get 20 for each trick below the number you bid if trump was clubs and diamonds, 30 if trump was spades or hearts and 40 points for one trick below your bid plus 30 points for each addition, if you bid no-trump.

Tips & Warnings

  • There are many bridge variations as well as additional in-game options, such as doubling bids, slams and points based on whether a partnership is considered vulnerable. The World Bridge Federation has a downloadable booklet at worldbridge.org/departments/rules/GeneralConditionsOfContest2009.pdf.

References

Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

You May Also Like

  • How to Score in Bridge

    The game of bridge may be one of the most complex card games as well as one of the most popular. Bridge...

  • How to Play Crazy Bridge

    You can play crazy bridge with three or more players. Crazy bridge resembles standard bridge, spades and other card games in which...

  • How to Play Back Alley Bridge

    Back Alley Bridge is a card game that originated in the U.S. military during World War II. A few different versions of...

  • How to Play Free Bridge Online

    Bridge is one of the most strategic partner card games ever created. You can hone your bridge skills by playing for free...

  • How to Play Bridge

    Contract or rubber bridge is a partnership bidding game emphasizing communication between two sets of two partners. The object of the game...

  • Rules for the Military Bridge Card Game

    Playing cards have been used for nearly a thousand years and were invented in China. One of the most strategically complex of...

Related Searches

Check It Out

How to Build and Grow a Salad Garden On Your Balcony

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!