How to Get Scorch Marks Out of Microfiber Couches

Save

"Microfiber” is a measure of the size of a fabric’s fibers. Technically, every fabric made from fibers smaller than one denier in diameter is a microfiber. However, outside of the scientific community, the word “microfiber” is commonly used to describe a soft, suede-like fabric made from polyester or nylon. The fibers of this material are so tiny they can be bound tightly together, forming a stain-resistant surface that is impervious to water damage, sun fading and piling. A durable, hard-wearing material, microfiber is often used to create furniture; however, when couches and chairs are set too close to baseboard heaters or fireplace, the high temperatures can leave shiny patches or dark marks on the upholstery. While heavily burned or melted microfibers cannot be restored, lightly scorched patches can be easily removed.

Things You'll Need

  • Medium-grit sandpaper
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Household ammonia
  • Plastic cling film
  • Tape
  • Cornstarch
  • Distilled white vinegar

Buff any scorched spots with medium-grit sand paper. Rub gently, moving with the nap of the fabric, to soften the damaged material.

Dab the affected area with a cotton ball that has been soaked in hydrogen peroxide. Repeat the procedure, using household ammonia, then cover the fabric with plastic cling film and wait 1 hour. Secure the cling film with strips of tape, if necessary.

Remove the cling film and wipe the material with a damp sponge until the fabric is evenly moist.

Sprinkle cornstarch over the damp fabric. Wait 1 hour, and then sweep the powdery residue away with a stiff-bristled brush. Repeat, as needed, until the stain is completely gone.

Wipe stubborn scorch marks with a paper towel that has been dipped in distilled white vinegar, and then blot the fabric with a clean cloth and repeat, if necessary.

Related Searches

References

Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

Related Searches

Check It Out

22 DIY Ways to Update Your Home on a Small Budget

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!