Removing Paint From Shoes

Save

Whether it's water- or oil-based, removing splattered paint from shoes is a difficult task that can get even tougher depending on the type of material the shoes are made of. If the shoes are new, an old favorite or an expensive pair, it may be worth the effort it takes to attempt paint removal. Patience and persistence, in addition to the right cleaning materials, are the secrets to success.

Fabric or Canvas Shoes

Latex or Acrylic Water-Based Paint

Tip

  • Removing wet paint from fabric shoes is easier and yields better results than trying to remove dry paint. Keep paint wet throughout the cleaning process; if the paint is already dry, scrape away as much as possible with a stiff bristled brush before wetting.

Things You'll Need

  • Clean cloth
  • Toothbrush
  • Dish soap
  • Nail polish remover
  • Cotton ball or swab

Step 1: Wipe Wet Paint

Dip a clean cloth in water and wipe away as much wet paint as possible from the shoe. For large spills, scoop off paint with a spoon.

Step 2: Rinse with Water

Run the shoe under warm water to rinse out remaining paint.

Step 3: Scrub the Sole

Using an old toothbrush, scrub any paint that is on the sole of the shoe.

Step 4: Wash with Soap

Mix one part warm dish detergent and one part water in a bucket. Wet a cloth or sponge in the soapy water and wring it out before blotting the leftover paint stain vigorously. Repeat the process until most of the paint is removed.

Step 5: Blot Spots

Pour a small amount of nail polish remover on a cotton ball and blot gently until all paint is removed. Rinse the shoe under warm water.

Step 6: Launder

Launder shoes in the washing machine in cold water on the delicate cycle and allow them to air dry.

Removing Oil-Based Paint

Things You'll Need

  • Clean cloth
  • Spoon
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Cotton ball or swab
  • Mineral spirits
  • Dish soap

Step 1: Wipe Wet Paint

Dip a clean cloth in water and wipe away as much wet paint as possible from the shoe. For large spills, scoop off paint with a spoon.

Step 2: Apply Rubbing Alcohol

Soak a cotton ball or swab in rubbing alcohol -- gently squeeze out the excess so it's not dripping -- and dab it on the paint-stained spot until the stain loosens and lightens.

Tip

  • For stubborn oil-based paint stains, alternate between applying mineral spirits and water to the stain using a cloth or toothbrush and blotting thoroughly between each application.

Step 3: Blot, Don't Rub

Blot a cloth dampened in warm, soapy water on the stain before rinsing under warm water until the paint is removed.

Step 4: Launder

Wash shoes in the washing machine in cold water on the delicate cycle and allow them to air dry.

Leather Shoes

Removing Latex or Acrylic Water-Based Paint

Things You'll Need

  • Clean cloth
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Cotton ball or swab
  • Leather conditioner

Step 1: Wipe Wet Paint

Wipe away wet paint with a dry cloth, taking care not to smear the paint over a larger area. Work on one small section at a time.

Step 2: Dab with Alcohol

Dip a cotton swab in rubbing alcohol and dab on the paint until it loosens and is removed.

Step 3: Blot Dry

Wipe the old paint spot with a clean, dry cloth, blotting until it dries.

Step 4: Buff

Rub leather conditioner on any discolored spots and buff using firm pressure and a soft cloth to even out the finish.

Removing Oil-Based Paint

Things You'll Need

  • Clean cloth
  • Commercial residue removing product
  • Cotton ball or swab
  • Leather conditioner

Step 1: Wipe Wet Paint

Wipe away wet paint with a dry cloth, taking care not to smear the paint over a large area. Work in one small section at a time.

Step 2: Dab on a Residue Remover

Apply a small amount of a commercial cleaning product made for removing sticky or greasy messes to a cotton ball or swab and let it sit for one minute on a small paint spot. Gently wipe away the paint and cleaner with a soft cloth.

Step 3: Air Dry

Allow the shoe to dry overnight after the paint is removed.

Step 4: Buff

Rub leather conditioner on any discolored spots and buff using firm pressure and a soft cloth to even out the finish.

Tip

  • If it's dried paint on the leather, use your fingernail or the tip of a thin knife to peel off as much paint as possible before buffing the area with leather conditioner.

Suede

Removing paint from suede shoes is the most difficult, but the treatment is the same for oil-based or water-based paint stains.

Things You'll Need

  • Clean cloth
  • Dish soap
  • Pencil eraser
  • Clean toothbrush or shoe brush
  • Fingernail file

Step 1: Blot Wet Paint

Remove as much of the wet paint as possible by blotting gently with a clean cloth.

Step 2: Clean With Soap

Mix a small amount of dish soap in warm water to create foaming bubbles and suds. Scoop up the soap suds and place them on the paint, rubbing them in gently with a clean cloth to remove the paint. Wipe with a dry cloth and allow to dry completely.

Step 3: Erase

Rub a pencil eraser in the direction of the suede's grain to lift away paint. Brush off eraser crumbs by hand.

Step 4: Dry Brush

Gently swipe a clean, dry toothbrush, fingernail brush or shoe brush on the stain to loosen dried paint.

Step 5: File

Run a fingernail file or fine-grit -- 220 or higher -- sandpaper over the spot gently to remove remaining paint.

Step 6: Dry Brush

Brush with a shoe brush or dry toothbrush to lift and restore the nap.

Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

You May Also Like

Related Searches

Check It Out

This Is the Beauty Routine of an Ex-Pat in China

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!