Tips on Cleaning Dust from Sanded Wood Floors


One of the benefits of having shiny hardwood floors is the ease in cleaning them. A periodic wipe-down should be sufficient. But when your wood floors have been sanded, the job gets a little more complex. Here are a few pointers on how to clean sanded wood floors:

Safety First

  • Freshly sanded wood floors emit quite a bit of dust. When working in dusty areas, make sure you have proper ventilation and/or are wearing a dust mask. There's nothing worse than to have pretty floors but not be able to enjoy them because you can't breathe.


  • To remove the layer of dust that typically accompanies a newly sanded wood floor, first use a vacuum cleaner. If you don't have one, use a broom. While sweeping, take note to sweep the dust away from the corners of the room, which trap particles easy. Rather than sweeping over large swaths of the floor to deposit dust outside the room, use a dustpan.

Light Mop

  • A light rubdown with minimal water is beneficial as well. Remember, when you sand wood floors you've effectively taken off the exterior surface and exposed the porous interior. Prolonged or excessive water exposure is not recommended for a sanded wood floor. The water can damage the soundness of the wood. However, taking a slightly water-dampened mop and going over sections of the floor in circular motions is effective in removing dust particles. The light mop-up shouldn't leave an excessive amount of moisture on the floor. If it does, use a rag to wipe up the excess water.

Mild Solvent

  • The final step is to use a mild solvent -- mineral spirits. Mineral spirits work as a petroleum distiller, removing the small amounts of oil, trash and grease that have worked its way into the wood. Put a dab of the mineral spirits on a clean rag and wipe thoroughly. Once you've wiped the mineral spirits on the floor, let it dry before finishing the wood floors.


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