The Types of Staple Guns

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Several different types of staple guns are produced which all work to do the same thing, but which perform that job in different ways. Designed to be more resilient than common paper staplers, staple guns can be used to install carpeting, install vapor barriers on wood foundation projects and even hang holiday lights.

Hand Actuated Staple Guns

  • Homeowners commonly use hand-actuated staple guns. They are inexpensive and easy to use, actuate them by pressing the staple gun against the surface where the staple goes. After you position the gun in place, presses down on the top handle. This pulls a spring within the head of the stapler. When you have fully depressed the handle, the spring releases and fires the staple.

Hammer Staplers

  • Hammer staplers are designed quite differently from typical hand actuated staplers. While they still utilize a spring mechanism, this mechanism us used to recoil the stapler to prepare it for the next staple rather than firing the staple. The hammer stapler is swung the same way in which you would swing a hammer. When the head of the stapler makes contact with the surface, the weight of the stapler pushes the staple into the surface being stapled.

Electric Staple Guns

  • Electric staple guns are constructed in the same way that hand actuated staplers are constructed, except that they have a trigger mechanism similar to hammer staplers. A servo inside the stapler senses when the trigger is depressed against the surface to be stapled and fires the stapler in.

Air Actuated Staple Guns

  • Air actuated or pneumatic staple guns use a similar construction as hand and electrically actuated staple guns. On air staplers, however, an air line feeds pressurized air into a reservoir inside the body of the staple gun. A switch is located near the head of the staple gun so that when the stapler is pressed against the surface to be stapled, the air reservoir releases air, firing the staple into the surface.

References

  • "Air Tools: How To Choose, Use and Maintain Them"; Rick Peters; 2000
  • "Hand Tool Essentials"; Popular Woodworking Editors; 2007
  • "Working with Power Tools"; Paul Anthony; 2007
  • Photo Credit Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images
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