My Freezer Won't Seal

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With the rising cost of energy, a broken freezer seal can be a big problem in need of immediate repair. The seal, or gasket, often wears out with time and requires replacement. Your first step is to identify the extent of the problem. If the seal is broken and worn or cannot be fixed with basic repairs, then it should be replaced. A poorly sealing freezer can be an energy drain and may not cool your food correctly, either.

Symptoms

  • A number of problems may arise that indicate a broken freezer seal. Frost or frozen condensation may develop on the interior of the compartment due to the entrance of warm, humid air. In this case, the freezer has to work harder to keep things cool, which may be revealed on your energy bill. Poor seals can also result in excess frost development, resulting in low efficiency and poor quality in your frozen food.

Diagnosis

  • You can pinpoint the extent of malfunction in a seal with careful investigation and a dollar bill test. Close the freezer door on a dollar bill or slip of paper and see if it falls or slips out easily. Examine the gasket all the way around, searching for malformed, mildewed or cracking sections. You can also feel for cold air around the gasket when the door is closed. Any incidence of leaking air is a problem and should be addressed.

Fixing It Yourself

  • Replacing the gasket yourself can save money but may prove to be a complicated endeavor. Review your appliance manual for information about replacement parts. Remove the old gasket by pulling up its lip and locating the gasket retainer, a metal frame that holds it in place. It is probably held in by screws that can then be loosened. Place the new gasket in the retainer and reattach. This repair only costs the price of the replacement gasket, but if you aren't comfortable with such repairs, you should contact a professional repair service.

Professional Fix

  • Professional repair companies are adept at replacing freezer gaskets. At the time of publication, such a service costs between $150 and $300, according to the University of Georgia. A professional ensures that the new gasket is well-mounted and sealing properly. It is essential that a freezer gasket works properly; otherwise, the problem can create long-term additional energy costs.

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