How to Store Firewood in a Shed

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Storing wood in a shed helps keep your wood dry and ready for immediate burning, but done incorrectly, it can actually moisten the wood or prevent it from fully drying (curing). When this happens, wood crackles with sap or takes a long time to catch fire. Additionally, wet wood produces more smoke than dry wood, as the water moisture steams and the sap boils and burns. Combined, these two components of wet wood can create a nasty, stinking, snap-crackling and smoking fire. Done correctly, storing wood in a shed will provide you with ready-to-burn wood for those cold winter nights.

Things You'll Need

  • 4 planks, 6 inches by 1 inch by 72 inches
  • 4 cloth tarps
  • Lay two 6-inch by 1-inch by 72-inch planks of wood parallel to one another on the shed floor approximately 6 inches apart. The planks will elevate your wood, allowing air to circulate beneath the wood and help facilitate drying. If your shed has any vents, place your planks near the vents, and you should designate these two planks of wood as your "drying" stack.

  • Lay two additional 6-inch by 1-inch by 72-inch planks of wood parallel to one another on the shed floor approximately 6 inches apart. You can position these two planks anywhere in your shed, and you should designate these two planks of wood as your "feed" stack, because when you select wood to burn, you will select it from the feed stack.

  • Lay the wood perpendicular (across) the planks so that the wood spans the distance between them. Make sure to butt each piece of wood up against another as your lay the row. As you stack wood, stack freshly cut wood or wet pieces on the "drying" planks, and stack seasoned wood or dry pieces on the "feed" stack.

  • Stack additional rows by laying more wood in the crevices created between individual pieces of wood. For instance, after you split a log, you have a roughly triangular (or pie-shaped) section. Stacking triangular objects beside one another creates reverse triangular spaces, and you should lay the wood in these spaces.

  • Stack wood to 24 inches wide by 48 inches high by 8 feet long, which equals a half cord. A half cord of wood consists of 64 cubic feet (cf) and represents a common unit of wood. One to two cords of wood will generally get you through the winter.

  • Cover each stack of wood with the cloth tarps. The cloth tarps will help draw moisture from the wood, much like cookies in plastic containers draw moisture from an accompanying piece of bread. Swap the two tarps for two dry ones when they become moist.

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