How to Make Your Own Latex Sheet

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Latex sheets are used for several craft and costume projects. They can be purchased at stores and online, but the cost can be high for some hobbyists. An alternative is to make your own sheets of latex, using liquid latex and foam brushes found at any hardware store. You can tint the latex if desired, or leave it a natural color. The process is relatively fast, allowing you to create many sheets in a short time.

Things You'll Need

  • Multi-purpose cleaner
  • Liquid latex
  • Latex tint (optional)
  • Foam sponge brushes
  • Hair dryer
  • Baby powder
  • Powder brush
  • Scissors (optional)
  • Clean a large countertop with multi-purpose cleaner to prepare it to make the latex sheet. Allow the counter to completely dry.

  • Add a latex tint to liquid latex, following the instructions on the bottle, if you want a colored sheet. Untinted latex is a yellowish color when it dries.

  • Pour a small amount of liquid latex onto the counter and use a foam brush to spread it out to the dimensions that you require. Add more latex if needed until you have covered the entire area.

  • Dry the latex with a hair dryer.

  • Apply at least three more layers of latex, using a new foam brush for each layer. You can add as many layers as you wish until you reach the desired thickness. Thicker sheets are stronger, but they do not stretch as well as thin sheets.

  • Apply baby powder to the surface of the dried sheet. This will prevent the latex from sticking it itself.

  • Peel the sheet off of the counter slowly, brushing powder underneath it as you go.

  • Trim the edges of the sheet with a sharp pair of scissors if needed.

Tips & Warnings

  • The layers of latex must be thin. If they are too thick, a skin will form on top, preventing the latex underneath from drying.
  • Larger latex sheets can be made on the floor using the same technique.
  • Keep liquid latex out of hair, clothing and carpet. It will bond and be very difficult to remove.

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References

  • "Stage Makeup-Sixth Edition"; Richard Corson; 1981
  • "The Prop Builder's Molding & Casting Handbook"; Thurston James; 1989
  • Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images
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