How to Paint Window Glaze

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Glazing putty is the compound that holds window glass in place in the window frame. Glazing putty also seals cracks and helps insulate the windows. Over time, window glaze often cracks and crumbles, allowing air to leak through the windows. After replacing window glaze, your next step is to paint the glaze to ensure complete waterproofing. Follow the window glaze manufacturer's instructions for glaze curing time before you paint to avoid damaging the glazed surface.

Things You'll Need

  • Painter's tape
  • Latex exterior primer
  • Latex exterior paint
  • 1-inch paintbrush
  • Affix painter's tape to the edges of the window glass to keep paint off the windows. Place the painter's tape 1/16-inch away from the glaze so that a thin line of paint covers the glass --- this creates an effective seal over the window glaze.

  • Apply the primer over the window glaze using the paintbrush. Prime the entire glaze and wood surface of the window. Ensure the primer covers the glaze in a thin and even layer. Allow the primer to dry completely.

  • Paint the window surface with the exterior paint. Cover the entire primed surface with paint and allow the paint to dry completely.

  • Remove the painter's tape from the glass. You should have a neat line of paint extending onto the window glass 1/16 inch.

Tips & Warnings

  • Some window glazes require a short curing period before painting, and others require as long as two weeks. Follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully or you risk painting the glaze before it hardens sufficiently. This could lead to cracked paint.

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References

  • Photo Credit Colonial Window Panes with brick building reflected image by Jorge Moro from Fotolia.com
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