How to Color Beeswax

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Beeswax has a natural yellow tint which can be dyed.
Beeswax has a natural yellow tint which can be dyed. (Image: velas image by Norberto Lauria from Fotolia.com)

Beeswax is produced by honeybees and used to build honeycombs inside their hives. It has a natural yellow tint and a unique scent that comes from honey and pollen. Beeswax is used to make candles, crayons, cosmetics, polishes, among many other products. It tends to be more expensive than other types of wax, but it is clean-burning and 100% organic. Beeswax can be colored using specially-made wax dyes, plant-based dyes, food coloring, or even crayons.

Things You'll Need

  • Medium saucepan
  • Tin can
  • Beeswax
  • Wooden spoon
  • Tongs
  • Wooden cutting board
  • Paste food coloring
  • Toothpicks
  • Small glass container

Fill a medium sauce pan 1/4 with water. Place a clean tin can in the center of the pan. Place the pan over medium heat. Cut or break the beeswax into small chunks and place it inside the tin can.

Watch the wax continuously as it melts. Stir the wax occasionally as it begins to liquefy. Once the wax has completely melted, remove the pan from the heat. Use a pair of tongs to remove the tin can from the sauce pan and place it on a wooden cutting board.

Add paste food coloring to the melted wax. Use a toothpick to scoop out a bit of the coloring and dip in in the wax. Stir the wax as you add the color to evenly distribute it. Continue to add the food coloring until the wax is the desired shade.

Pour the wax carefully into a glass container so as not to get hot wax on your skin. Let the container sit for 24-48 hours to allow the colored wax to dry.

Tips & Warnings

  • Add a wick to your container before adding the wax to make a candle.
  • When choosing a color for your beeswax, take into account the yellow tint already there. For example, blue dye may react with the yellow wax and create a green tint.

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