How to Make a Water Trough Out of Wood

Save
An example of a rustic watering trough.
An example of a rustic watering trough. (Image: drinking trough in lenk switzerland image by ALLAN GROSSKRUEGER from Fotolia.com)

Water troughs were traditionally constructed out of wood. More recently, troughs are made out of galvanized metal, stainless steel or some form of plastic. Although these modern troughs may have the advantage of durability, they lack character and time-honored tradition. A modern organic farmer or those interested in self-sufficient homesteading would do well to construct their own watering troughs out of wood. Although wood is not the most durable method for storing water, it does hold water well and can be replaced or repaired with ease and little expense.

Things You'll Need

  • Three 2-by-12-by-48-inch rough milled pine boards
  • Two 2-by-12-by-12-inch rough milled pine boards
  • Tape measure
  • Screw gun
  • Coated 3 ½-inch deck screws
  • Two 4-by-4-by-12-inch rough milled pine posts

Set two of the 2-by-12-by-48-inch rough milled pine boards parallel to each other approximately 12 inches apart. Measure with a tape measure 3 inches in from each end of both boards. Mark these points with a pencil.

Place the two 2-by-12-by-12-inch rough milled pine boards between the two long boards so that they are perpendicular to them and lined up with the pencil marks.

Fasten the boards together using a screw gun and 3 ½-inch coated deck screws. Screw from the outside of the long boards into the ends of the square boards. This forms the basic box for the trough.

Take the remaining long pine board and lay it in line with the edges of the box. This will form the bottom of the trough. Use a screw gun to screw the bottom into place. Space the screws evenly every 6 to 8 inches.

Flip the trough over. Place the two 4-by-4-by-12-inch rough milled pine posts parallel to each other approximately 36 inches apart. Set the trough on these posts. The posts form the base for the trough, which simply rests on them.

Fill the trough with water. It may leak until the wood swells. Once the wood has swelled, the trough will cease to leak.

Related Searches

References

Promoted By Zergnet

Comments

You May Also Like

Related Searches

Check It Out

DIY Wood Transfer Christmas Ornaments

M
Is DIY in your DNA? Become part of our maker community.
Submit Your Work!