How to Remove Wall-Mounted Faucets

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Wall-mounted faucets are the most common faucet design, and are typically found within showers and bathtubs. Within these faucets, and at the base of each faucet valve, are a number of rubber seals. These rubber seals tend to crack over time, whether they are used frequently or not. Leaks are symptomatic of corroded faucet seals. Most valves can be repaired, but some can only be replaced with a new valve. In either event, the existing valves must first be removed.

Things You'll Need

  • Pliers or a wrench
  • Flathead screwdriver
  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Plastic putty knife
  • Adjustable wrench
  • Deep-set socket
  • Socket wrench
  • Stop the water supply from entering the faucet's plumbing by turning the water supply valve next to the water meter off with a pair of pliers or a wrench.

  • Disconnect the plastic handle insert from the center of the faucet's handle to the reveal the screw, which holds the handle in place. The insert typically features a decorative design or the letters "C" and "H" to denote cold and hot. The insert can be pried off of the handle with a flathead screwdriver.

  • Remove the Phillips head screw from the center of the faucet's handle with a Phillips screwdriver, then pull the handle away from the faucet valve to remove it.

  • Remove the trim plate, which rests against the wall to reveal the faucet valve. Trim plates can be attached to the wall with one or more screws, or with a bead of caulking around its edge. If the plate features screws, remove the screws with a screwdriver, then pull the trim plate away from the wall. If caulking is instead used, cut through the caulking with a plastic putty knife, then remove the plate.

  • Remove the bonnet nut, which surrounds the tip of the faucet valve with an adjustable wrench. Turn the nut in a counterclockwise direction with the wrench to remove it.

  • Remove the faucet valve from inside the wall. To remove the valve, insert a deep-set socket over the tip of the valve and into the wall, then spin the socket until it locks onto the valve. Use a socket wrench to turn the valve in a counterclockwise direction until the valve is loose, then pull the valve out of the wall to remove it.

References

  • "Home Repair Guide;" Ten Pound Books; 2007
  • "Home Improvement 1-2-3;" Benjamin Allen; 2003
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