How to Make a Vaporizer at Home


Making a personal home vaporizer can reduce or totally eliminate the need for purchasing large, cumbersome vapor units and keeping them maintained. Simple soldering hardware can be reused and coupled with a small heated atomizer to produce clouds of vapor from small amounts of fluid. The average experimenter can build a personal vaporizer in about a half hour.

Things You'll Need

  • Soldering iron and solder
  • Cold Heat soldering gun
  • Four AA batteries
  • M401 electronic atomizer
  • M401 fluid cartridge
  • Remove the batteries from the Cold Heat soldering iron by unscrewing the battery cover and letting the batteries slide out.

  • Pull off the ceramic tip at the front of the device by lightly tugging on it with bare fingers. Do not use a tool to remove the tip, as it could become damaged. The black tip shown in the picture is what will come off in one piece.

  • Inside the removed tip, bend the contact on the right (viewed as in the picture) down so that it is lower than the opposite contact.

  • Solder the M401 atomizer's positive internal contact to the right side terminal on the Cold Heat gun with a short piece of insulated wire. Ideally, wire above 14 gauge should be used, but thicker wires could prove difficult to solder.

  • Press the M401 atomizer into the soldering gun's tip hole, making sure that the left terminal makes contact with the exterior of the atomizer. This is the negative contact, and the casing of the atomizer serves to ground it.

  • Add a liquid-filled M401 cartridge to the atomizer, and press the Cold Heat gun's power switch to activate it. As the atomizer warms up, the fluid is vaporized and drawn through the tip by the user.

Tips & Warnings

  • Different atomizers can produce more vapor, but the M401 fits into the Cold Heat tip opening.
  • Do not work on the Cold Heat gun with the batteries in place.


  • Photo Credit,, Tracy V. Wilson/,
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