How to Grow Texas Red Star Hibiscus Seeds

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Texas red star hibiscus is a very hardy plant that sports beautiful five-pointed red flowers for almost the entire summer growing season. Each flower, which can be quite large, lasts only a day, but a healthy Texas red star hibiscus can blossom up to several dozen flowers in a single day. These plants like lots of sun and also lots of water since they are related to the swamp mallow. They attract bees, butterflies and birds and can grow to a height of 7 feet. They grow best in growing zones 7 through 11, but as long as they get plenty of sun they can be grown in other zones as well. They are easily started from seeds.

Things You'll Need

  • Texas red star hibiscus seeds
  • Potting soil.
  • Common yard soil.
  • Pots
  • Spray bottle
  • Trowel
  • Push two or three Texas red star hibiscus seeds 1/4 inch into a mixture of 50 percent potting soil and 50 percent common backyard soil in a medium-size pot approximately two weeks before the last frost. Cover the seeds with the soil mixture but do not compact it.

  • Water thoroughly with a spray bottle, getting the soil quite damp. Keep the pot in a sunny location where it receives up to one hour of direct sunlight each day (any more could bake the seeds). Keep the soil good and moist.

  • Look for the seeds to germinate within 10 to 14 days. Allow the plants to grow for four or five days and then thin by removing the smallest of the plants and leaving the largest and strongest.

  • Plant outside immediately when all possibility of frost has passed. Dig a hole with your trowel large enough to hold the soil and roots from the sprouting pots, mix a trowel full of potting soil into the hole and plant in a sunny location. Do not compact the soil more than necessary around the plants.

  • Water with a sprinkler until the ground is soaking wet. Allow the ground to dry slightly and then water frequently for large, abundant flowers. Your Texas red star hibiscus should start blooming within three to a maximum of four weeks.

  • Leave flower stalks on the plant to encourage seed production. Allow the seed pods to dry on the plant, then cut and store in a sealed baggie until ready to plant. Simply break the pod open and plant the seeds.

  • Cut the plants back to 4 inches from the ground after the first frost. If plants are growing in zones 7 through 11, your Texas red star hibiscus will regrow in the spring following the last frost.

Tips & Warnings

  • Plant Texas red star hibiscus toward the back of your garden if you plan to mix other plants into the flowerbed, since this variety of hibiscus can get to be 7 feet tall.

References

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